Dance troupe – Sahno Bar http://sahnobar.com/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 20:50:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sahnobar.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/profile-120x120.png Dance troupe – Sahno Bar http://sahnobar.com/ 32 32 Lancaster-based dance troupe hosts Juneteenth dance celebration https://sahnobar.com/lancaster-based-dance-troupe-hosts-juneteenth-dance-celebration/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 18:06:00 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/lancaster-based-dance-troupe-hosts-juneteenth-dance-celebration/ The Imani Edu-tainers presented Lancaster residents with a showcase of traditional African dance LANCASTER, Pa. — The sound of African drums echoed throughout the Ware Center as Edu-tainers Imani rehearsed for Saturday’s gourd concert. The musicians and dancers worked for a month to put together this showcase for the Lancaster community. “It’s going to be […]]]>

The Imani Edu-tainers presented Lancaster residents with a showcase of traditional African dance

LANCASTER, Pa. — The sound of African drums echoed throughout the Ware Center as Edu-tainers Imani rehearsed for Saturday’s gourd concert. The musicians and dancers worked for a month to put together this showcase for the Lancaster community.

“It’s going to be rewarding to get on stage and show everyone what I know and educate them in traditional African dance,” said Katie Beth Wubbels.

“Getting the chance to play it is amazing because you get to spread cultural awareness, which is what this company is all about,” said Chianu McFarland.

The concert is part of a long weekend celebration of Juneteenth in conjunction with the Millersville University Intercultural Center.

Jae Whitlow, the event organizer and director of the Intercultural Center, said the event will not only serve as a celebration, but also as an educational opportunity.

“Particularly around the importance and contribution of black people, but then merging West African culture into our celebration,” Whitlow explained.

Whitlow hopes residents who attend the weekend celebration will come away with new perspectives while enjoying the music and dancing.

“If you’re not stomping or slapping, I don’t know what’s wrong with you,” Whitlow joked. “Whether it’s the first time you hear African drums, or the 100th time you hear African drums, or it’s in your veins, we can all take something away from this evening. Because we are all in this journey of self-discovery, rediscovery and the ability to be in community with one another.

The Imani Endu-tainers will be at the Ware Center again on Sunday to host a variety of Juneteenth activities.

]]>
After a decade of ups and downs, dance troupe Aurora marches front and center – Chicago Tribune https://sahnobar.com/after-a-decade-of-ups-and-downs-dance-troupe-aurora-marches-front-and-center-chicago-tribune/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 19:12:00 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/after-a-decade-of-ups-and-downs-dance-troupe-aurora-marches-front-and-center-chicago-tribune/ When Martin Luna-Espinoza arrived in downtown Aurora on Sunday morning to set up for the city’s Pride Parade, he was surprised — perhaps more shocked — to learn that his dance troupe kicked off the show. Because the kids he started Simply Destinee with ten years ago have now graduated, the majority of the dancers […]]]>

When Martin Luna-Espinoza arrived in downtown Aurora on Sunday morning to set up for the city’s Pride Parade, he was surprised — perhaps more shocked — to learn that his dance troupe kicked off the show.

Because the kids he started Simply Destinee with ten years ago have now graduated, the majority of the dancers are new, he told me, and were more than a little excited. to secure such first place in the prestigious – and this year, controversial – parade.

“I told them, don’t get used to it,” Luna-Espinoza recalls, looking back on the many obstacles this group has faced over the years, including the time he and now-husband partner Jose Espinoza had to sleep in their van to keep the studio doors open.

“Sometimes,” he reminded the young marchers, “you’ll have to be backwards in these parades.”

But even if Simply Destinee isn’t always front and center in the public eye, there’s no doubt that the band’s feet are firmly planted in the Aurora community. Not only did his dance troupe get to kick off the Pride Parade, Jose and Martin Luna-Espinoza were honored by the City of Aurora in the first ever Pride Flag Raising Ceremony for their commitment to helping marginalized children emerge from the shadows and find their place.

I first met Martin Luna-Espinoza, a former JCPenney photographer, in October 2013 with a 16-year-old East Aurora High School student named Oscar, who had just been discharged hours earlier from the hospital after was severely beaten by the police. were investigating a hate crime.

The teenager, his face shattered, swollen and bruised, had no place to go but the studio of Simply Destinee which, created in memory of Luna-Espinoza’s teenage niece who had committed suicide, had become a safe haven for children struggling with bullying and depression. .

I remember many tears during this interview, not just from this physically and emotionally damaged gay teenager, but also from Luna-Espinoza, who despite abandoning his apartment and sleeping in his van in order to be able to afford space on Highland Avenue, didn’t have the money for that month’s rent at the facility.

He knew his dream of helping so many injured young people was in jeopardy.

But one thing Luna-Espinoza has in addition to a lot of passion and compassion is tenacity. After that first column aired, the band was able to move to a much bigger and better studio on the second floor of the Leland Tower in downtown Aurora, where the kids spent a lot of their time and sweat renovating. of this historical space.

Then, eight months after celebrating this new home with a big Thanksgiving feast, Luna-Espinoza hit a new low: while burying his beloved mother, Simply Destinee had two days to find another site. , because the new owner of the building needed this second floor for other purposes.

Because the group had become better known, largely through partnerships with other youth groups and community leaders who recognized the importance of this work, Simply Destinee was able to relocate again, this time to a more small part of the old Keystone building. .

Yet as Simply Destinee’s numbers and profile continued to grow — he even auditioned for “America’s Got Talent” — it became increasingly difficult to keep up with the costs.

In 2015, with over 100 children and a waiting list, community leaders continued to offer their support to the dance troupe, whether through contributions, networking or fundraising efforts. There has even been talk of merging with more established nonprofits. But Luna-Espinoza, along with co-founder Liza Oliva, Destinee’s mother, were convinced that any merger would “lose that personal touch” that the group prided itself on offering children.

Simply Destinee really turned out to be special.

Rena Church, retired executive director of the Aurora Public Art Commission, calls it “one of the best nonprofits in the community” because its leaders are “really genuine,” she said. . Moreover, not only are they “about as open and honest as possible” because there are no egos or hidden agendas, “they want to learn to work together” with others, which is not That’s not always the case in the nonprofit world. .

“Martin and Jose make it so easy to love them,” she said, adding that a lot of what they’ve been able to accomplish has been because “they did it from their own pocket”.

And so, Simply Destinee Youth Center and Dance Team – now its full title and located on the lower level of the Legal Arts Building at 122 W. Downer Place, continued its march, keeping the doors open and expanding after-school programs – currently in 14 schools – that combine social/emotional learning with dance.

By the way, the band does more than just get the kids moving to the beat of the music. Simply Destinee also offers cooking classes, sewing, car maintenance and ways to earn extra money on the side, which has become especially important during COVID and as the economy has slowed because “a lot of our families,” Luna-Espinoza noted, “struggles to earn that extra dollar.

Although the pandemic has reduced the number of members, the number is starting to climb again, he says, adding that, more than ever, he and other advisers are concerned about “lack of motivation” in children who “seem s ‘being disinterested in things’ since the pandemic.

On the positive side, Luna-Espinoza noted, the fallout from the pandemic has helped reduce the stigma around mental health because, as people find themselves dealing with more of these issues within their own families, they become more vulnerable. are increasingly involved in education and awareness.

Similarly, he continued, the gay community has also made huge strides, certainly compared to his experiences as a teenager when he felt he was leading a secret life until he took a course. sponsored by the church who “really helped me” with his identity.

For example, Luna-Espinoza quickly ticked off how all schools now have gay/straight alliances, more and more LGBTQ restaurants are becoming mainstream, and there are even local drag queen shows “attracting young, old, straight and gays who a few years ago you would have had to go to Chicago to see.

He credits a small but determined group of local Pride leaders with their efforts to move that community towards a “different feel to the conversation”.

According to Luna-Espinoza, the Simply Destinee roller coaster is reminiscent of the Aurora’s Pride movement, which suffered a backlash this year after the city pulled its float from the parade in response to the Pride committee asking police officers not to not wear a uniform when marching in the parade. .

The event was briefly canceled due to lack of security until triple overtime pay was offered to the cops. Which, according to Luna-Espinoza, made Sunday’s event all the “bigger and better” as fans knew how close it was to not happening.

“There’s more joy,” he said, referring to both Simply Destinee and the parade, “when you take steps back but keep moving forward.”

dcrosby@tribpub.com

]]>
The Vertigo dance troupe celebrates 30 years of contemporary choreography https://sahnobar.com/the-vertigo-dance-troupe-celebrates-30-years-of-contemporary-choreography/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 08:34:31 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/the-vertigo-dance-troupe-celebrates-30-years-of-contemporary-choreography/ The Vertigo dance troupe celebrates 30 years of choreography and movement with three days of performances, June 15-17, at the Suzanne Dellal Center for Dance and Theater in Tel Aviv. The troupe, created in Jerusalem by choreographers Noa Wertheim and Adi Sha’al, partners in work and life, will celebrate art, community and the environment, the […]]]>

The Vertigo dance troupe celebrates 30 years of choreography and movement with three days of performances, June 15-17, at the Suzanne Dellal Center for Dance and Theater in Tel Aviv.

The troupe, created in Jerusalem by choreographers Noa Wertheim and Adi Sha’al, partners in work and life, will celebrate art, community and the environment, the very heart of this contemporary dance organization.

Each of the three days is devoted to one of the values ​​that have driven the troupe for three decades.

It begins with its commitment to nature and an outdoor performance of “Birth of the Phoenix” by veteran and young Vertigo dancers on Wednesday. Art arrives, as conceived by Noa Wertheim’s choreography in “Pardes” on Thursday. And finally humanity, represented by the Vertigo “Power of Balance” team, the troupe’s work with professional dancers and dancers with disabilities, including a panel on dance and physical disability on Friday.

Vertigo is also celebrating its anniversary with a video exhibition, “Liba”, created in cooperation with the Parks and Nature Authority in the Bell Cave of Beit Guvrin.

Available to the public on weekends until July 14, from Thursday evening to Saturday evening, the “Liba” exhibition is made up of massive video installations showing the movements Wertheim created for the walls and corners of the cave.

The combination of stage performance and art in nature is emblematic of the veteran dance troupe, which has always aimed to merge dance, family and community, and the environment.

It started with Wertheim and Sha’al dancing and choreographing together in Jerusalem, before building the Vertigo Eco-Art Village at Kibbutz Netiv Halamed Hey, their learning center which involved creating an organizational model for teaching dance and ecology.

Tickets for the various events and shows surrounding Vertigo’s 30th anniversary can be purchased on the Vertigo website.

It’s not (only) about you.

Supporting The Times of Israel is not a transaction for an online service, like subscribing to Netflix. The ToI Community is for people like you who care about a common good: to ensure that balanced and responsible coverage of Israel continues to be freely available to millions of people around the world.

Of course, we’ll remove all ads from your page and you’ll have access to great community-only content. But your support gives you something deeper than that: the pride of joining something that really matters.

Join the Times of Israel community Join our community Already a member? Log in to stop seeing this

You are a dedicated reader

That’s why we started The Times of Israel ten years ago – to provide discerning readers like you with must-read coverage of Israel and the Jewish world.

So now we have a request. Unlike other media, we don’t have a paywall in place. But since the journalism we do is expensive, we invite readers to whom The Times of Israel has become important to support our work by joining The Times of Israel community.

For just $6 a month, you can help support our quality journalism while benefiting from The Times of Israel WITHOUT ADVERTISINGas well as access Exclusive content only available to members of the Times of Israel community.

Thanks,
David Horovitz, founding editor of The Times of Israel

Join our community Join our community Already a member? Log in to stop seeing this

]]>
The Cork Indian Dance Troupe will host an evening of performances for Cork Penny Dinners https://sahnobar.com/the-cork-indian-dance-troupe-will-host-an-evening-of-performances-for-cork-penny-dinners/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 10:25:12 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/the-cork-indian-dance-troupe-will-host-an-evening-of-performances-for-cork-penny-dinners/ An Indian dance troupe is hosting a night of magical performances and fundraising in Cork City, with proceeds going to Cork Penny Dinners. Indian dance troupe Aatma, who you may remember from their amazing St. Patrick’s Day performances and a surprise proposal on St. Patrick’s Street, will put on a show and be joined by […]]]>

An Indian dance troupe is hosting a night of magical performances and fundraising in Cork City, with proceeds going to Cork Penny Dinners.

Indian dance troupe Aatma, who you may remember from their amazing St. Patrick’s Day performances and a surprise proposal on St. Patrick’s Street, will put on a show and be joined by other dance groups from Cork for the fundraising evening.

There will also be performances by dance theater company Making Moves, UCC Staff Dance Company and Rhythmic feet tap dancers, as well as an Irish dancing ensemble.

A GoFundMe page was set up ahead of the event with donations earmarked for Cork Penny Dinners, which voluntarily provides thousands of freshly prepared meals each week to those in need.



Aatma Indian Dance Troupe

Over an hour of dancing and with traditional Indian snacks served, Aatma said they “hope everyone will join our efforts to raise funds for Cork Penny Dinners”.

Troupe founder and leader of the UCC Indian Alumni Community, Dr Lekha Menon Margassery, said: “We hope to contribute to the Cork community that has nurtured our passion by providing us with an audience and a stage. on which to play.

“We hope everyone will join our efforts to raise funds for Cork Penny Dinners.”

The theme of the show is Navarasa: 9 Human Emotions and will take place July 9 at UCC’s Aula Maxima venue with tickets available online.



“Nine emotions, nine performances” in Navarasa

]]>
Eight-year-old performs with Britain’s Got Talent Diversity dance troupe https://sahnobar.com/eight-year-old-performs-with-britains-got-talent-diversity-dance-troupe/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 03:33:45 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/eight-year-old-performs-with-britains-got-talent-diversity-dance-troupe/ Faith was “in her element” with Diversity An eight-year-old girl from Didcot has been selected from a theater crowd to record a song with Britain’s Got Talent dance troupe, Diversity. Lifelong dancer Faith Featherstone went to see the musical group perform at the New Theater in Oxford last week with her mother Jennie and a […]]]>

Faith was “in her element” with Diversity

An eight-year-old girl from Didcot has been selected from a theater crowd to record a song with Britain’s Got Talent dance troupe, Diversity.

Lifelong dancer Faith Featherstone went to see the musical group perform at the New Theater in Oxford last week with her mother Jennie and a friend.

The British street dance troupe led by choreographer Ashley Banjo, who are best known for winning season three of Britain’s Got Talent in 2009, are currently touring the UK and were in Oxford for two nights.

READ MORE: Artists gather to protest against the war in Ukraine

On Tuesday, May 31, Faith was chosen from the audience by dancer Jordan Banjo to record part of a song that they would dance to later in the show.

Miss Featherstone, who runs Angels Performing Arts School at Didcot, said her daughter was ‘in her element’ after being chosen to perform.

“She was chosen out of thousands of people,” she said. “It was a bass line with his voice that was mixed and played to the audience.

“It was so much fun and everyone at the end was saying she was amazing and did a really good job of representing Oxford.

“She was in her element, out of all these kids, she was chosen to go – it was so nice and really lovely.

“I was shaking thinking, ‘Ah, what’s going to happen?’ But she was so natural at it. Then I loved it and it was absolutely buzzing, I couldn’t believe it.

After singing the words “drop that bass” into a microphone, the song was then edited and played to the audience as the dance troupe performed it.

Oxford Mail:

Oxford Mail:

READ MORE: Hundreds attend Platinum Jubilee Lighthouse Lighting Ceremony

Faith was then able to meet Diversity after the show and take some pictures with the group of which she has been a fan “forever”.

Miss Featherstone added: ‘Our friends and family loved it. We’re all into the performing arts, my parents and sisters were all brought up with the performing arts in our lives – it’s a family affair.

Angels Performing Arts School is also due to take part in a workshop with the dance group in September at the Essex headquarters.

They will take dance lessons with the group as well as a “questions and answers” ​​session.

Miss Featherstone has now started choreographing a new dance to Faith’s recording with Diversity and hopes the performing arts school can perform the routine at its next showcase.

READ MORE: Colorful images show a beautiful rainbow in Oxford

“I even sent it to Diversity on Instagram,” Miss Featherstone said. “They’re very busy so they didn’t respond, but I started choreographing the routine the very next day.”

This story was written by Gee Harland, she joined the team in 2022 as a senior multimedia reporter.

Gee covers Wallingford and Didcot.

Get in touch with her by emailing: Gee.harland@newsquest.co.uk

Follow her on Twitter @Geeharland

A message from our editor

Thank you for reading this story and for supporting the Oxford Mail.

If you like what we do consider subscribing to Oxford Mail and in return we will give you unlimited access with less advertising on our website from the latest news, surveys, features and sports.

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Tik Tok to find out more.

You can also join the conversation in our Facebook groups: stay ahead of traffic alerts here, catch up on the latest court news here, share your favorite Oxford memories here, get your daily dose of celebrities here and take some time with news that will make you smile.

If you have a story for our reporters, send us your news here. You can also list an event for free here.

]]>
Fairfield Dance Troupe Wins Gold at Hip Hop International USA https://sahnobar.com/fairfield-dance-troupe-wins-gold-at-hip-hop-international-usa/ Mon, 30 May 2022 00:35:48 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/fairfield-dance-troupe-wins-gold-at-hip-hop-international-usa/ FAIRFIELD – An accomplished dance studio in Fairfield recently brought Hip Hop International USA Dance Championship Gold to Burbank. The Chapkis Dance Academy won two gold and two silver medals in the May 13-15 competition at the Los Angeles Marriott Burbank Airport Hotel and Convention Center. Amber and Greg Chapkis brought young dancers to this […]]]>

FAIRFIELD – An accomplished dance studio in Fairfield recently brought Hip Hop International USA Dance Championship Gold to Burbank.

The Chapkis Dance Academy won two gold and two silver medals in the May 13-15 competition at the Los Angeles Marriott Burbank Airport Hotel and Convention Center.

Amber and Greg Chapkis brought young dancers to this competition, with the Jr. Chapkidz winning the junior division and Chapkidz winning the JV Megacrew class.

“It’s a whole new generation. My team is well known and has a huge heritage. We won six years ago, so now the kids watching live are stepping up now. For me, it was a test. I just wanted to see how they were doing. They’re younger. The rookies. Rookies,” Grep Chapkis told the Los Angeles Times.

Attempts to reach Chapkis failed.

According to the Times article, the competition became much more personal for Chapkis due to the incorporation of the Ukrainian flag into the dance routine.

Chapkis has ties to Ukraine and a well-known dance family in that country. He still has family, friends and others he knows who are caught up in the war.

“Now it just has to stop. For me, I’m going to express that and raise awareness through what I do. I felt like Hip Hop International was the perfect platform to send that message,” Chapkis said in the Times article.

HHI USA Dance Championship gold medalists include Jr. Chapkidz of Fairfield (Junior Division), Lil Supremes of San Diego (Varsity), Alpha League of San Diego (Adult), Killas Projekt of Las Vegas (Minicrew), Chapkidz of Fairfield (JV Megacrew) and Supremacy Dance Fam of San Diego (Megacrew).

]]>
Meet the lively senior dance troupe who put on delightful extravaganzas to benefit children in need https://sahnobar.com/meet-the-lively-senior-dance-troupe-who-put-on-delightful-extravaganzas-to-benefit-children-in-need/ Sun, 22 May 2022 06:34:59 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/meet-the-lively-senior-dance-troupe-who-put-on-delightful-extravaganzas-to-benefit-children-in-need/ Some have great-grandchildren, others remember when gas was only 30 cents a gallon. But they can all still put on a show that draws crowds as young as the Gen-Zers. For most people Vivian Jeffers’ age, just getting dressed in the morning is a major feat. But until a recent fall, the 98-year-old danced alongside […]]]>

Some have great-grandchildren, others remember when gas was only 30 cents a gallon. But they can all still put on a show that draws crowds as young as the Gen-Zers.

For most people Vivian Jeffers’ age, just getting dressed in the morning is a major feat.

But until a recent fall, the 98-year-old danced alongside other real-life golden girls who make up a jaw-dropping cast of professional dancers, including former NFL cheerleaders and Radio City Rockettes from the 1960s.

They call themselves The New Florida Follies, a name that alludes to their elaborate costumes, dance numbers and classic Broadway-stay look, with demanding performances ranging from kick line formations, twists and turns. pinwheel and even lip synchronization.

(Courtesy of New Florida Follies)

They are 55+, with Jeffers currently being their oldest member. Although she is one of the few who has not danced professionally, she has been dancing all her life. During the Depression, she worked hard for the 15 cents she received each week, so she could take tap lessons at a dance studio around the corner in West Philadelphia where she grew up.

“I love dancing because it brings joy to both the performer and the audience,” said Jeffers, who is on leave at the moment after suffering a double shin injury but continues to drive, d go to church and take Zumba classes. “Who doesn’t love a good number,” she added.

Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of New Florida Follies)

Dance for a cause

With a long history of quasi-soldouts for their shows at the famous Parker Playhouse in Ft. Lauderdale, Jeffers is right. The group, which also includes former Jackie Gleason Show dancers from the 50s and 70s and retired backing vocalists from Manhattan’s Latin Quarter, is a revamp of the original Florida Follies, created by the new dance legend. Yorker Cathy Dooley in 2001. Since 2015, the silver-haired troupe has been under the direction of Cheryl Steinthal, a former Rockette from New York who has been dancing since the age of 4. The 67-year-old Atlantic City, New Jersey native also danced with Liza Minelli and was a stage director and choreographer for the Miss New York and Jersey pageants.

Continue to Dooley’s Following in his footsteps, Steinthal went on to choreograph the New Florida Follies, a unique celebrity for often-forgotten Golden Age performers. After a year-long hiatus due to the recent pandemic, she has stepped up the group’s annual performances to now put on seven shows a year.

The Leggy Ladies (plus four male members) train three hours a day, twice a week. Besides the physical demands, there are also a myriad of rapid costume changes behind the scenes. The only time their age really seems to show is at height. As Steinthal said, “we have to retake height measurements from time to time…the reality is that people shrink as they get older.”

Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of New Florida Follies)

Despite all their hard work, the dancers don’t take a penny from their ticket sales. They are completely unpaid and operate purely as a non-profit organization with all profits going to various children’s charities. As their slogan says, “we are the older generation taking care of the younger generation.”

One of the groups they help is The Ukulele Kids Club, an organization that donates ukuleles to children hospitalized with cancer and other serious illnesses around the world. The New Florida Follies also donate directly to children’s hospitals like the Children Diagnostic Treatment Center in Ft. Lauderdale and also to the Make-A-Wish Foundation. “It’s the kids,” Jeffers pointed out, that motivates her. “That’s what I love the most, helping children.” She even took dance lessons with her daughter to stay in shape.

It’s show time

Despite being an all-volunteer troupe, their shows are designed with the same kind of detailed fanfare as high-paying gigs.

At one point, six former Rockettes were performing together, including Arlene Acker, who worked in a show with Annette Funicello, a popular teenage star in the 1950s; and Sheila Philips, who once had late-night lasagna with Liberace while on tour in Las Vegas. The Ohio native who began his 14-year stint with the Rockettes in 1966, Philips also makes the eye-catching, heavily scalloped feathered headpieces that the dancers wear in the various skits they put on.

Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of New Florida Follies)

As for their hit shows, they’ve included unforgettables like a full-length rendition of Copacabana, Barry Manilow’s popular 1980s retro musical, and “Million Dollar Baby,” a highly choreographed number at a Charleston speakeasy in the 1920s, involving purse theft.

There were snafu moments too. During an umbrella number for “Opening Day At The Races,” which is based on a scene from the classic musical “My Fair Lady,” one of the dancers lost her giant wig when her umbrella got caught in it, leaving her on stage with just a wig cap.

“It happens to be his first year, his very first year,” Steinthal recalls. “So she just grabbed her wig and ran off the stage.” A few seconds later, she returned after a few simple words of encouragement from the stage manager: “Just put the wig back on your head and go away!” she exclaimed to the frantic dancer.

The New Florida Follies are full of endless surprises. As classic as their routines may be, the senior dancers also kept up with modern times, donning a fantastic Star Wars number dressed in black with golden capes to represent Darth Vader.

Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of New Florida Follies)

With Jeffers pushing 100, the New Florida Follies found a way to showcase the mother of six, grandmother of nine, and great-grandmother of eight, while easing the show’s demands on she.

Until her downfall, Jeffers could be seen in the spotlight playing the tambourine in a number set to the old but cool tune, “Music! Music! Music! (Put another nickel in it). Jeffers, who is deeply religious, called the New Florida Follies the ultimate “sorority” and an experience she never expected to have in her senior years. “Thank God for that,” she said.

The girlfriends that the New Florida Follies clearly are. With a mountain of bragging rights, it’s Jeffers that Steinthal is decidedly bragging about. “She can still take a good step forward,” she said.

]]>
Taiwanese dance troupe wins Spanish flamenco competition https://sahnobar.com/taiwanese-dance-troupe-wins-spanish-flamenco-competition/ Sat, 14 May 2022 11:53:00 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/taiwanese-dance-troupe-wins-spanish-flamenco-competition/ Taipei, May 14 (CNA) Taiwanese dance troupe Genio Dance Group won first prize in a flamenco competition in Madrid, Spain on Friday. Led by Taiwanese dancer Hsueh Yu-hsien (薛喻鮮), the troupe won the group category of the 31st edition of the Certamen de Coreografía de Danza Española y Flamenco with the work “Eterno retorno”. Hsueh […]]]>

Taipei, May 14 (CNA) Taiwanese dance troupe Genio Dance Group won first prize in a flamenco competition in Madrid, Spain on Friday.

Led by Taiwanese dancer Hsueh Yu-hsien (薛喻鮮), the troupe won the group category of the 31st edition of the Certamen de Coreografía de Danza Española y Flamenco with the work “Eterno retorno”.

Hsueh then expressed surprise and joy that the group had won the highly competitive final competition which included six other teams.

Hsueh, who started learning dance from her mother Ho Lian-hua (賀連華) at a young age, said that dancing was her life and she put all her feelings and emotions into her work.

She thanked Culture Minister Lee Yung-te (李永得) and the Ministry of Culture office in Spain for supporting the team, which left for Spain last week to participate in the contest.

Speaking to CNA on Saturday, Chang Yu-hsuan (張祐瑄), an official from the Ministry of Culture (MOC) office in Spain, said she was delighted to see that Genio Dance Group, whose performances combined the different cultural traditions of Taiwan and Spain, could shine on the stage of a major Spanish dance event and be rewarded with a prize.

Started in 1992, the Certamen de Coreografía de Danza Española y Flamenco competition is organized each year by Producciones Maga, a company currently led by Spanish dancer Margaret Jova, according to the MOC.

Participants in this year’s competition had to provide a video of their performance to the jury via YouTube or Vimeo, and only those who made it to the final were invited to compete at a cultural center in Madrid on Friday.

Genio Dance Group was founded in 2000 by Ho Lian-hua, who is dedicated to promoting flamenco dance in Taiwan, MOC said.

]]>
Review: Diversity – Connected is a dazzling show from the dynamic dance troupe https://sahnobar.com/review-diversity-connected-is-a-dazzling-show-from-the-dynamic-dance-troupe/ Fri, 06 May 2022 09:24:55 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/review-diversity-connected-is-a-dazzling-show-from-the-dynamic-dance-troupe/ Like many productions, this new dance performance by England has an incredible talent winners Diversity has been delayed because of you know what. So, some fans in the audience had booked to see this dynamic dance troupe two years ago. You can feel the excitement as you take your seat. Emcee, director and choreographer Ashley […]]]>

Like many productions, this new dance performance by England has an incredible talent winners Diversity has been delayed because of you know what. So, some fans in the audience had booked to see this dynamic dance troupe two years ago.

You can feel the excitement as you take your seat.

Emcee, director and choreographer Ashley Banjo takes you on a journey of what connects and disconnects us when it comes to new technologies.

While designing this show and preparing it, none of us realized that we would be using this technology in place of face-to-face contact due to lockdown and restrictions.

Banjo doesn’t mind that and he’s covered here via a Zoom call to his mom, when he shows her his new baby boy, Micah. It’s a moving video clip, because it reminds us of exactly what we lost in that time.

But at the same time, where would we be without our phones? We were able to order food from our favorite restaurants, take part in quizzes with family and friends, and download another TV series to get through the tough months ahead.

The show covers both pros and cons.

The concept is designed to inform and educate alongside the dance segments and also fill time as dancers go out and change and come back with a new routine. The problem is that the information you receive isn’t deep or new, and it’s a bit repetitive.

You keep hearing about connection, then you see diversity dancing and you know exactly what they’re talking about.

From a Charlie Chaplin routine that takes you back to a group number featuring Ashley Banjo and drones flying overhead, to their brilliant Black Lives Matter segment that sparked controversy on England has an incredible talentthere’s incredible variety on stage here in this ambitious and serious, yet dazzling production.

The BLM section is one of the most incredible three minutes of dance I’ve seen in years because it moves you, makes you angry, and desperately asks for change.

Each dancer is committed and each movement is performed as an act of defiance but also of love for their profession and for equality and, yes…diversity.

It’s breathtaking to see this on stage and the audience got up the night I attended. I found it incredibly moving and could watch it over and over.

In a You Tube celebration, the cast moonwalks across the stage in tribute to the music of Michael Jackson, and your jaw drops to the ground. I almost turned to my companion and said, “Annie, are you okay? “. The wide variety of dances exhibited here is amazing.

Video screens and enhanced cinema sound mean there’s plenty to see, and sometimes you yearn for tender moments where dancing can portray the language of love.

And there is a nice sequence where the dancers are paired up, dancing with their mobiles on and their texts are seen on the screen. It’s incredibly poignant, because it shows how we’ve lost this ability to live in the moment.

Climate change is also covered, and you start to feel a bit bombarded because there’s so much material here that it could be covered in many shows instead of just one night.

Every dancer has their own wonderful moment in this show and it takes strong teamwork to bring a show like this to the stage.

Perri Kiely still has that fearlessness he had as a kid during BGT auditions. Jordan Banjo provides comic relief, interacts with the audience, and conveys his self-deprecating wit.

Each of the members of the dance troupe deserves kudos for performing with passion, energy, courage and determination. Their moves are clever, but they also interact with the audience and bring them into the narrative.

Sometimes the dance can be beautiful, but there is a chasm between the performer and the audience.

Here, Diversity does what Ashley Banjo set out to do: they hook up.

Diversity: Connected is at the Opera until 7and May. You can book tickets here.

]]>
Ukrainian dance troupe in the US is fighting misinformation, one high kick at a time https://sahnobar.com/ukrainian-dance-troupe-in-the-us-is-fighting-misinformation-one-high-kick-at-a-time/ Sun, 01 May 2022 14:57:16 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/ukrainian-dance-troupe-in-the-us-is-fighting-misinformation-one-high-kick-at-a-time/ After a pandemic hiatus, the Voloshky Ukrainian Dance Ensemble is a little rusty. A few times a week, about two dozen semi-professional dancers perform choreography in the basement of the Ukrainian Educational and Cultural Center in suburban Philadelphia. In their ranks are engineers, designers and students, united by a common heritage. The one who is […]]]>

After a pandemic hiatus, the Voloshky Ukrainian Dance Ensemble is a little rusty.

A few times a week, about two dozen semi-professional dancers perform choreography in the basement of the Ukrainian Educational and Cultural Center in suburban Philadelphia.

In their ranks are engineers, designers and students, united by a common heritage. The one who is now under attack.

“[Russia is] trying to rewrite our history and it’s time for us to say ‘no’. We fight back,” said dancer Maria Molyashcha.

An estimated 57,000 Ukrainian-born people and their descendants live in the Philadelphia area, making it the second-largest Ukrainian community in the United States, according to census data.

Since the Russian invasion, this diaspora has shifted into high gear: collecting donations, lobbying the federal government to send arms, and educating an American public suddenly focused on their homeland.

The Ensemble, which celebrates its 50th anniversary this year, sees its role in the fight against Russian aggression as diplomacy through dance, teaching American audiences about Ukrainian history and culture.

Choreographer and executive director Taras Lewyckyj, 59, has been studying Ukrainian dance since he was around 4 years old.

“It’s a very catchy way to dance. It’s a bit like breakdancing,” he said, particularly hopak, a folk dance thought to have evolved from combat moves performed by the Cossacks.

Born in Philadelphia to Ukrainian parents, Lewyckyj grew up speaking Ukrainian and studying the history and culture of his ancestral homeland.

“I have two sisters and a brother. If dad came home and we spoke English, we should write down what he heard [in Ukrainian] 50 times on a sheet of paper,” he said.

While he used to chafe at such strict rules, Lewyckyj has come to see the Ukrainian American community as a “safe” for a unique culture that has been under attack for centuries.

“My father’s father was shot in front of the family,” said Lewyckyj, targeted for promoting Ukrainian language and culture, seen as a threat to Soviet control. He sees the same kind of purge happening in Ukraine now, following Vladimir Putin’s insistence that Ukraine and Russia are “one people”.

Some members of the troupe were born in Ukraine themselves, so the war feels even more personal.

Dancer Khristina Maria Babiychuk, a 27-year-old engineer from western Ukraine moved to the United States as a teenager. “After that [war] started, we hardly get any real sleep,” she said.

His mother recently returned to Ukraine, bringing military supplies with her. “For three people, they had about 90 suitcases for body armor and helmets, because that’s something that can’t be shipped,” Babiychuk said. His grandfather and uncle still live in Ukraine.

In Philadelphia, Ukrainian and Russian immigrants share many of the same spaces. Dancers described family members’ tense moments at work and heard slurs against Ukrainian independence.

“Even here in the United States, when people have access to all streams of information, people still choose to believe [Russian propaganda]”, said dancer Dariya Medynska.

She said the Ensemble hopes to counter misinformation by showing Ukraine in a positive light.

“We are here, it’s not like we are fighting on the front line, but we are fighting,” Medynska said.

This year’s choreography also highlights the subversive side of Ukrainian dance. Many pieces in the band’s repertoire involve characters acting out a story that appears to be about one thing, but is actually about Russian oppression during the Tsarist or Communist era.

“It’s really great to put them on right now, to show the chronic nature of this cultural identity theft,” Lewyckyj said.

A few weeks later, the Voloshky Dance Ensemble prepared to perform at an international spring festival, held at a local high school. Hundreds of people walked around the gymnasium or sat in front of the stage on folding chairs.

The Voloshky dancers gathered in the locker room early, smoking their costumes and practicing their moves.

When it was their turn, the Ensemble began with a few lighter pieces, welcoming the audience and honoring spring. Next, Lewyckyj presented a political satire called The Puppet Dance.

In this one, a dancer wearing a Russian fur cap tries to come between a Ukrainian couple. It ends in kicks to the behind and the Russian rolls over.

“We can only hope for happy endings like that. And you can probably understand why this dance was banned in the Soviet Union,” Lewyckyj told the audience.

For a finale, the group still performs the hopak, with its acrobatic movements inspired by fights. A man did an airborne split. Another turned his head.

This time the show ended with a song that has become the battle cry for an independent Ukraine.

Lewyckyj shouted in Ukrainian: “Glory to Ukraine!”

The crowd responded, “Glory to the heroes!”

Copyright 2022 NPR. To learn more, visit https://www.npr.org.

]]>