Dance group – Sahno Bar http://sahnobar.com/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 04:54:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sahnobar.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/profile-120x120.png Dance group – Sahno Bar http://sahnobar.com/ 32 32 Vernon’s dance group brings the taste of Ukraine to the table https://sahnobar.com/vernons-dance-group-brings-the-taste-of-ukraine-to-the-table/ Mon, 07 Nov 2022 17:30:00 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/vernons-dance-group-brings-the-taste-of-ukraine-to-the-table/ Vernon’s Sadok Ukrainian Dance Ensemble is hosting the Fall Harvest Ukrainian Dinner and Dance on Saturday, November 26 at Eagles Hall. (Contributed) Vernon’s dance group brings the taste of Ukraine to the table The Sadok Ukrainian Dance Ensemble is hosting the Fall Harvest Ukrainian Dinner/Dance on Saturday, November […]]]>


Vernon’s Sadok Ukrainian Dance Ensemble is hosting the Fall Harvest Ukrainian Dinner and Dance on Saturday, November 26 at Eagles Hall. (Contributed)


Vernon’s dance group brings the taste of Ukraine to the table

The Sadok Ukrainian Dance Ensemble is hosting the Fall Harvest Ukrainian Dinner/Dance on Saturday, November 26





Vernon’s famous Sadok Ukrainian Dance Ensemble brings a taste of Ukraine to the North Okanagan.

The dance group will host Fall Harvest Ukrainian Dinner and Dance on Saturday, November 26 at Vernon’s Eagles Hall on 25th Avenue (next to the Morning Star).

Cocktails start at 5:30 p.m. and dinner is at 6 p.m. The menu offers a real Ukrainian dinner. A cash bar will be available.

The evening also includes a performance by Sadok, and you can dance the night away to the sounds of the Vic Ukrainetz Band, which will play polka and Ukrainian-Canadian rock.

Tickets are $40 for adults, $25 for youth 18 and under, and $18 for children 11 and under.

You can get tickets by emailing sadok@shaw.ca or calling 250-309-6948.

DancefundraiserUkraineVernon


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RAM and Dance Group Celebrate Fet Gede Show in Miami | PICTURES https://sahnobar.com/ram-and-dance-group-celebrate-fet-gede-show-in-miami-pictures/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 13:57:09 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/ram-and-dance-group-celebrate-fet-gede-show-in-miami-pictures/ MIAMI — From permanent residence to Hotel Oloffson in Port-au-Prince, RAM has been a staple of the Haitian rasin cultural scene, at home and abroad, for decades. In 2019, the roots music group performed their last show in Haiti, then turned to virtual vacations during the pandemic. About a year ago, the band started performing […]]]>

MIAMI — From permanent residence to Hotel Oloffson in Port-au-Prince, RAM has been a staple of the Haitian rasin cultural scene, at home and abroad, for decades. In 2019, the roots music group performed their last show in Haiti, then turned to virtual vacations during the pandemic. About a year ago, the band started performing in person in the United States.

This year, the group was delighted to celebrate Fet Gede — the holiday of Haiti feast in honor of the ancestors – he had been performing since the 1990s in person, back in Haiti. But in early October, said the group’s founder, Richard Augustine Morse, the group found itself setting up a new base in New Orleans.

“The generators and the amount of electricity provided by the government will not support rehearsals,” Morse said, in a phone interview from New Orleans. “That’s really why we had to go out.”

This last Saturday evening, RAM kicked off its annual gede celebrations at the Miami Beach Bandshell instead. With featured music from DJ Krazy Mix and an opening fixed by NSL Dance Togetherthe event drew hundreds, mostly Haitians.

Morse, 66, said they were looking forward to performing in Haiti for the first time since the pandemic, but with the country blockages, the five shows scheduled for Haiti in November have been canceled. Even if the band could have managed to get together to practice at the Oloffson, which Morse has managed all these years, there wouldn’t be enough gas for rehearsals.

These daily challenges have an impact.

“[In Haiti] People are hurting, people are getting killed, journalists are getting killed,” Morse said. “You don’t hear about all of them, guess it’s worse than you think. I try to focus on music just because it’s important to people.

Morse, who grew up in Connecticut with an American mother and a Haitian father, said RAM’s performances — consisting mostly of traditional songs — serve as a bridge for people who might not otherwise have access to the ceremonies.

“People who don’t have access to the ceremonies can have access to the chants and can get to know each other and the meaning of the chants,” he said. “The songs reflect modern times, so that gives them their strength, their ability to adapt to new situations.”

“The best part is when it feels like new again,” he added.

Alongside Morse are his wife Lunise, the band’s lead singer, their daughter Isabelle and their eldest son William, who plays guitar in the 11-member band.

Although not in their original base, it may be different now, Morse said, the group’s purpose and the enjoyment it brings to audiences remains the same.

“People go there and laugh, at Gede they swear, it’s sexual, they talk about sex parts so it’s funny,” Morse said. “Cultural identity is important. As the world blends in, it’s good to know where your roots are.

RAM Founder Richard A Morse presents the show Fet Gete at the Miami Beach Bandshell on Saturday, October 29, 2022. Photo by Ashley Miznazi
Crowds gather around the stage as RAM’s performance begins at the Miami Beach Bandshell on Saturday, October 29, 2022. Photo by Ashley Miznazi
RAM lead singer Lunise Morse performs at the Miami Beach Bandshell on Saturday, October 29, 2022. Photo by Ashley Miznazi
RAM presents the Fet Gete show at the Miami Beach Bandshell on Saturday, October 29, 2022. Photo by Ashley Miznazi
William Morse, son of Richard and Lunise, plays guitar at the Miami Band Bandshell on Saturday, October 29. Photo of Ashley Miznazi
The crowd sing along to the music during RAM’s concert at the Miami Beach Bandshell on Saturday, October 29, 2022. Photo by Ashley Miznazi
RAM lead singer Lunise Morse dances to music from the Miami Beach Bandshell on Saturday, October 29, 2022. Photo by Ashley Miznazi
Crowds wait for RAM to perform after the opening set of the Fet Gete show at Miami Beach Bandshell on Saturday, October 29, 2022. Photo by Ashley Miznazi
NSL Dance Ensemble presents the Fet Gede Celebration Opening Set at the Miami Beach Bandshell on Saturday, October 29, 2022. Photo by Ashley Miznazi.
NSL Dance Ensemble presents the Fet Gede Celebration Opening Set at the Miami Beach Bandshell on Saturday, October 29, 2022. Photo by Ashley Miznazi.
NSL Dance Ensemble presents the Fet Gede Celebration Opening Set at the Miami Beach Bandshell on Saturday, October 29, 2022. Photo by Ashley Miznazi.

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RAM and Dance Group Celebrate Fet Gede Show in Miami | PICTURES https://sahnobar.com/ram-and-dance-group-celebrate-fet-gede-show-in-miami-pictures-2/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 13:57:09 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/ram-and-dance-group-celebrate-fet-gede-show-in-miami-pictures-2/ MIAMI — From permanent residence to Hotel Oloffson in Port-au-Prince, RAM has been a staple of the Haitian rasin cultural scene, at home and abroad, for decades. In 2019, the roots music group performed their last show in Haiti, then turned to virtual vacations during the pandemic. About a year ago, the band started performing […]]]>

MIAMI — From permanent residence to Hotel Oloffson in Port-au-Prince, RAM has been a staple of the Haitian rasin cultural scene, at home and abroad, for decades. In 2019, the roots music group performed their last show in Haiti, then turned to virtual vacations during the pandemic. About a year ago, the band started performing in person in the United States.

This year, the group was delighted to celebrate Fet Gede — the holiday of Haiti feast in honor of the ancestors – he had been performing since the 1990s in person, back in Haiti. But in early October, said the group’s founder, Richard Augustine Morse, the group found itself setting up a new base in New Orleans.

“The generators and the amount of electricity provided by the government will not support rehearsals,” Morse said, in a phone interview from New Orleans. “That’s really why we had to go out.”

This last Saturday evening, RAM kicked off its annual gede celebrations at the Miami Beach Bandshell instead. With featured music from DJ Krazy Mix and an opening fixed by NSL Dance Togetherthe event drew hundreds, mostly Haitians.

Morse, 66, said they were looking forward to performing in Haiti for the first time since the pandemic, but with the country blockages, the five shows scheduled for Haiti in November have been canceled. Even if the band could have managed to get together to practice at the Oloffson, which Morse has managed all these years, there wouldn’t be enough gas for rehearsals.

These daily challenges have an impact.

“[In Haiti] People are hurting, people are getting killed, journalists are getting killed,” Morse said. “You don’t hear about all of them, guess it’s worse than you think. I try to focus on music just because it’s important to people.

Morse, who grew up in Connecticut with an American mother and a Haitian father, said RAM’s performances — consisting mostly of traditional songs — serve as a bridge for people who might not otherwise have access to the ceremonies.

“People who don’t have access to the ceremonies can have access to the chants and can get to know each other and the meaning of the chants,” he said. “The songs reflect modern times, so that gives them their strength, their ability to adapt to new situations.”

“The best part is when it feels like new again,” he added.

Alongside Morse are his wife Lunise, the band’s lead singer, their daughter Isabelle and their eldest son William, who plays guitar in the 11-member band.

Although not in their original base, it may be different now, Morse said, the group’s purpose and the enjoyment it brings to audiences remains the same.

“People go there and laugh, at Gede they swear, it’s sexual, they talk about sex parts so it’s funny,” Morse said. “Cultural identity is important. As the world blends in, it’s good to know where your roots are.

RAM Founder Richard A Morse presents the show Fet Gete at the Miami Beach Bandshell on Saturday, October 29, 2022. Photo by Ashley Miznazi
Crowds gather around the stage as RAM’s performance begins at the Miami Beach Bandshell on Saturday, October 29, 2022. Photo by Ashley Miznazi
RAM lead singer Lunise Morse performs at the Miami Beach Bandshell on Saturday, October 29, 2022. Photo by Ashley Miznazi
RAM presents the Fet Gete show at the Miami Beach Bandshell on Saturday, October 29, 2022. Photo by Ashley Miznazi
William Morse, son of Richard and Lunise, plays guitar at the Miami Band Bandshell on Saturday, October 29. Photo of Ashley Miznazi
The crowd sing along to the music during RAM’s concert at the Miami Beach Bandshell on Saturday, October 29, 2022. Photo by Ashley Miznazi
RAM lead singer Lunise Morse dances to music from the Miami Beach Bandshell on Saturday, October 29, 2022. Photo by Ashley Miznazi
Crowds wait for RAM to perform after the opening set of the Fet Gete show at Miami Beach Bandshell on Saturday, October 29, 2022. Photo by Ashley Miznazi
NSL Dance Ensemble presents the Fet Gede Celebration Opening Set at the Miami Beach Bandshell on Saturday, October 29, 2022. Photo by Ashley Miznazi.
NSL Dance Ensemble presents the Fet Gede Celebration Opening Set at the Miami Beach Bandshell on Saturday, October 29, 2022. Photo by Ashley Miznazi.
NSL Dance Ensemble presents the Fet Gede Celebration Opening Set at the Miami Beach Bandshell on Saturday, October 29, 2022. Photo by Ashley Miznazi.

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Lebanese dance group Mayyas wows audiences in Dubai https://sahnobar.com/lebanese-dance-group-mayyas-wows-audiences-in-dubai/ Sat, 22 Oct 2022 07:06:29 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/lebanese-dance-group-mayyas-wows-audiences-in-dubai/ DUBAI: When Sam Bardaouil and Till Fellrath began planning their curation of the Biennale de Lyon, in March 2020, the world was just beginning to wake up to the dangers of COVID-19. Naturally, the disruption and damage of the pandemic ended up being a major influence – not just logistically (it was delayed a year), […]]]>

DUBAI: When Sam Bardaouil and Till Fellrath began planning their curation of the Biennale de Lyon, in March 2020, the world was just beginning to wake up to the dangers of COVID-19.

Naturally, the disruption and damage of the pandemic ended up being a major influence – not just logistically (it was delayed a year), but thematically.

Bardaouil tells Arab News that the conversations he and Fellrath had with creatives all raised similar concerns. “We are all so aware of our fragility and our mortality, of the vulnerability of these structures that we have built – a virus and we are building from scratch. So there was this feeling of desperation. But, at the same time, people began to find ways to resist.

A work by Aref El-Rayess exhibited in the “Beirut and the Golden Sixties” section of the Biennale de Lyon. (Provided)

“We thought it would be important to talk about how this awareness of weakness could be the basis for a new way of thinking about forms of resistance that allow us to use this fragility as a springboard, instead of always put it aside. and always want more, stronger, better. Hence the theme of the biennale: “Manifesto of fragility”.

Bardaouil, who now lives in Berlin, is originally from Beirut, which in addition to the pandemic has also been through a financial and political meltdown and the horrific port explosion of August 2020 – which he says left residents of the city ​​in a more difficult situation. reflux than ever before.

The curators wanted to find a way to “shed light on this decades-long antagonism (in Beirut) – between times of prosperity and well-being and a sense of self-confidence and accomplishment, and those lows where you feel you are at an impasse.

But they knew they couldn’t just get Beirut into the Biennale de Lyon. It turned out that they didn’t need it. History provided.

A piece by Huguette Caland presented in the “Beirut and the Golden Sixties” section of the Biennale de Lyon. (Provided)

As the couple began to brainstorm ideas, they discovered that the two cities had been linked for hundreds of years, since Lyon was a major center of silk production and the region around Mount Lebanon became a source vital raw silk for local merchants. “In terms of size, it wasn’t the biggest,” Bardaouil explains. “But in terms of the power they had to monopolize the market, that was very significant.”

Wealthy families from Lyon began to acquire land in Lebanon, where they built factories to produce raw silk. By the 1850s it was a vital export and Lebanese farmers moved away from food crops to plant mulberry trees.

But then came the First World War. “And then, says Bardaouil, there is the famine. Because you can’t eat the leaves of the mulberry trees. So many people are forced to leave – this huge wave of emigration from Lebanon during the First World War to North America and other parts of the world, but also even earlier, because of the monopoly (from Lyon ), the farmers were still in debt to the agents who provided their money. So people started to emigrate in the 1870s and 1880s, and women started to enter the workforce. Many things we see today — the social status of Lebanese women; emigration; the rise of families that are still among the most dominant in politics and society – all traced back to silk and Lyon.

From the “Beirut and the Golden Sixties” section of the Biennale de Lyon. In the foreground, Simone Baltaxé Martayan, The Workers, ca. 1950-59 – On the right three works by Georges Doche. (Provided)

The ties deepened: Lyon silk merchants influenced the selection of the first French high commissioner in Lebanon and supported the Jesuits who established many of the country’s schools – not out of generosity, but to gain free labor. children’s work.

“It’s a very intriguing and ugly and beautiful story, all at the same time – an amalgamation of religion, politics, education and economics,” Bardaouil says.

The curators have enhanced this history with their usual flair. “We like to find entry points that bring a project into direct contact with its local context and then branch out into something more universal,” explains Bardaouil. The biennale therefore takes place in three stages. The first is centered on an individual: Louise Brunet, a Lyonnaise who took part in a revolt in 1834 against the terrible working conditions of the canuts, was sent to prison, then emigrated to work in a silk factory in Mount Lebanon, where she led a another revolt.

“For us, it has become this symbol of fragility and resistance”, explains Bardaouil. “We said to ourselves: ‘How many Louise Brunets are there in the world, throughout history?’ It could be a black woman brought from Senegal to pose as the wife of a Zulu chief during the 1894 colonial exhibition in Lyon. She could be a Japanese immigrant to America sent to a concentration camp after Pearl Harbor. It has become a metaphor, a symbol. In this section, we talk about the fragility of the race, the fragility of our bodies, our desires. All these things.”

View of “The Many Lives and Deaths of Louise Brunet” at the Biennale de Lyon, showing works by Giulia Andreani, “Les Fiancés” and “Le Rêve d’Ulysse”. (Provided)

From there, the show widens to look at an entire city as a symbol of fragility: Beirut. Specifically, its “golden age”, from the end of the French Mandate to the start of the Civil War, in five stages, spanning artists’ depictions of place, the body (including the women’s liberation movement), of form (the different styles that artists in Lebanon adopted), politics and war.

For the third part of the show, “A world of endless promises”, Bardaouil and Fellrath invited artists from around the world “to reflect with us on our fragility and the different forms of resistance. How to move forward using this fragility as a platform? How do we live in the world?

Through the works displayed in the middle section of the exhibition, Bardaouil says, “We wanted to celebrate these artists and tell them, ‘Look, this city has given so much. He was a major contributor to the language and practice of modernism. But at the same time, it’s a bit of a cautionary tale. Because if it was such a golden age, then how come we had a civil war a few years later, the repercussions of which are still with us today?

The nostalgia surrounding this period in Lebanon’s history is something Bardaouil has known since childhood – when clichés like “The Arab Riviera” or “The Paris of the East” were common.

“Child, of course, your eyes sparkle; it’s so exciting to hear,” he says. “I grew up in the heart of the Civil War, so it was completely foreign. But, still, you absorb it and it inspires you. And, at some point, people stop wondering if it’s Because you want to hold on to this idea that if it happened before, it could happen again – it becomes a form of potential redemption.

As Lebanon became a revered cultural mecca in the 1950s and 1960s – home to an influx of activists, artists, writers and intellectuals who had no platform in their own country – this posed its own problems, Bardaouil points out.

Louis Boulanger, circa 1849, Moorish woman – exhibited in “The Many Lives and Deaths of Louise Brunet”
at the Lyon Biennale. (Provided)

“It has become a flourishing place for all these ideas and projects and, sometimes, irreconcilable ideologies. And at some point, it became untenable,” he says. “There were people who benefited and others who did not. Some people felt empowered, others felt marginalized. And all of these things escalated until it came to a head in 1975.”

Bardaouil speaks of an “adoptive amnesia” that afflicted his country. “This is one of the biggest problems we face in Lebanon,” he said. “It’s almost like a national myth. But once you start looking at it, you better understand why we are here. The problems of the moment are related to what happened at the time. The topics covered in the biennale can, he hopes, lead to “moments of crystallization”.

Attempting to open up such conversations can be seen as a form of activism, he argues, “because you’re trying to challenge people on what they’ve taken for granted. And we can never find a common path if we all come from completely different ways of thinking about our past.

“That’s where this exhibit becomes more than just beautiful works of art,” he continues. “He said, ‘Wait! It’s not as simplistic or linear as one might think. It’s a lot more complicated, and we have to untangle it to find something we can all agree on.

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Anil Kapoor called a ‘legend’ after his video with dance group Quick Style went viral https://sahnobar.com/anil-kapoor-called-a-legend-after-his-video-with-dance-group-quick-style-went-viral/ Mon, 17 Oct 2022 06:48:20 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/anil-kapoor-called-a-legend-after-his-video-with-dance-group-quick-style-went-viral/ There’s hardly any social media user who hasn’t come across one of the dance clips from the now viral Norwegian Dance Crew Quick Style. A dance crew from Norway is stealing hearts across nations with their flawless performances to beat Bollywood numbers. Now Bollywood actor Anil Kapoor has collaborated with the group to perform on […]]]>

There’s hardly any social media user who hasn’t come across one of the dance clips from the now viral Norwegian Dance Crew Quick Style. A dance crew from Norway is stealing hearts across nations with their flawless performances to beat Bollywood numbers. Now Bollywood actor Anil Kapoor has collaborated with the group to perform on the song “Ek Ladki Ko Dekha”. Uploaded to Quick Style’s official Instagram handle, the caption read, “Always listen to the seasoned.”

The short clip shows the group of dancers turning to look at the dancer who portrays a woman. This happens as he crosses in front of them. Just as the camera pans, you can see Anil standing in the corner. He orders the boys to turn around and he starts moving in the opposite direction of the woman with all the boys following him. Looked:

Since it was uploaded, the video has garnered 222,000 likes. “Need a story on this!!! That’s a big thumbs up guys,” one Instagram user commented. Another person wrote, “Best thing on the internet today!!”

Meanwhile, earlier the group showed off their original dance moves to Kangana Ranaut’s hit song Sadi Gali from his film Tanu Weds Manu. The dancers ticked all the boxes, from eye-catching thumkas to stunning expressions. Sharing the clip on their Instagram profile, Quick Style, who have been creating an internet storm since the start of this month, wrote, “We’re not done yet.”

In one of their posts, the band can be seen performing to the 90s classic Chura Ke Dil Mera, from the film Main Khiladi Tu Anari. Shilpa Shetty, who co-starred with Akshay Kumar in the film, was one of the first celebrities to react to the video. “OMG, you are killing him. Truly stole my heart,” she commented on their post. A reaction from Akshay Kumar was also there. He commented, “With moves like these, it must be so easy to steal hearts. Fast style, indeed, dil chur aliya.

Read all Latest Buzz News and recent news here

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Lebanese dance group Mayyas will perform in Dubai next week – Emirates Woman https://sahnobar.com/lebanese-dance-group-mayyas-will-perform-in-dubai-next-week-emirates-woman/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 09:00:59 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/lebanese-dance-group-mayyas-will-perform-in-dubai-next-week-emirates-woman/ Way of life by Sarah-Joseph October 14, 2022 After gaining momentum around the world following their triumphant victory in America’s Got TalentMayyas is due to perform in Dubai next week. The Lebanese dance group will be part of an upcoming three-day music festival, Relm Fest, which will take place next weekend. A host of regional […]]]>

Way of life

After gaining momentum around the world following their triumphant victory in America’s Got TalentMayyas is due to perform in Dubai next week.

The Lebanese dance group will be part of an upcoming three-day music festival, Relm Fest, which will take place next weekend.

A host of regional artists such as Adonic, Jadal, Emirati singer-songwriter Hamdan Al Abrim, Lebanese singer Lea Makhoul and will also perform.

This star-studded three-day event will take place October 21-23, 2022 at The Pointe in Palm Jumeirah to recognize emerging musicians in the industry. Mayyas will perform on October 21.

In partnership with global platforms such as TikTok and Anghami, this event offers these individuals a platform to advance in their careers.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F9H06rgbTvs

How it all began ?

The Lebanese dance group won season 17 of the show after putting on a series of flawless dance performances, including their final performance, where the 30-woman team “danced as one” in the words of the actress and judge, Sophia Vergara.

The female-led dance group won a grand prize of $1 million (Dhs 3.7 million), with a host of congratulatory messages shared on social media by celebrities including Lebanese singer Maya Diab, Egyptian superstar Sherihan and many more.

The performance ended on a happy note with the audience waving the Lebanese flag as they applauded the crew. After months of hard work, the group is now known around the world and is now making a name for itself in Dubai.

To attend the concert restaurant reservation is essential or patrons can opt for the limited standing capacity near the stage on the East and West Promenade and doors open at 5pm. For RSVP, free entry is available subject to availability on relm.thepointe.ae

– For more on luxury lifestyle, news, fashion and beauty, follow Emirates Woman on Facebook and instagram

Images: Instagram @mayyas

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Lebanese dance group Mayyas, winner of ‘America’s Got Talent’, will perform in Dubai https://sahnobar.com/lebanese-dance-group-mayyas-winner-of-americas-got-talent-will-perform-in-dubai/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 06:56:04 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/lebanese-dance-group-mayyas-winner-of-americas-got-talent-will-perform-in-dubai/ DUBAI: Mo Amer couldn’t sleep. After more than 20 years in show business, the Palestinian-American comedian and actor’s moment had come – he had finally earned the biggest opportunity of his career: a role in the 200 million blockbuster DC superhero film “Black Adam” dollars. The next morning he was shooting a scene with one […]]]>

DUBAI: Mo Amer couldn’t sleep. After more than 20 years in show business, the Palestinian-American comedian and actor’s moment had come – he had finally earned the biggest opportunity of his career: a role in the 200 million blockbuster DC superhero film “Black Adam” dollars.

The next morning he was shooting a scene with one of his childhood heroes, Pierce Brosnan – a former James Bond – and his overwhelming joy ended up earning him four hours of scattered sleep before he rushed to the plateau, running on adrenaline, ready for anything. .

Well, everything except the scene itself.

“I was so excited to work with Pierce, I forgot to memorize my lines,” Amer told Arab News with a laugh.

Sarah Shahi and Mo Amer in “Black Adam”. (Photos by Warner Bros.)

He wasn’t the only one excited. While “Black Adam” is the start of a bold new future for the DC Extended Universe as it evolves beyond Batman and Superman and introduces a host of new characters, it’s the result of more than ‘a decade of tireless work, all beginning when Dwayne ‘The Rock’ Johnson first expressed an interest in taking on the titular anti-hero, inspired by ancient Egyptian mythology and first appearing in comics in 1945 .

“It’s been a long journey, a journey that has been fueled by passion, commitment and courage,” Johnson says.

For those who worked alongside Johnson on the trip, including producers Hiram Garcia and Beau Flynn, who made that first day on set, as Johnson walked in wearing the iconic black suit with a gold lightning bolt across his chest for the first time, a truly emotional moment.

“It felt like a big milestone for us. From the initial idea through the long development process, we worked tirelessly to bring Black Adam to life on the big screen. To see this hard work culminate in bringing it to the stage whereas Black Adam was truly a moment I will never forget,” Garcia says.

“I still get chills thinking about it,” Flynn adds. “What a moment.”

Noah Centineo as Atom Smasher and Quintessa Swindell as Cyclone in “Black Adam”. (Photos by Warner Bros.)

While the film positions Johnson as a potential anchor for DC in much the same way Robert Downey Jr. was for Marvel’s first decade, it also introduces a cast of characters who also got their start in the golden age of 1940s comics. – the Justice Society of America – that the film sets up for their own adventures.

“We’ve identified many paths we can take with these characters,” Flynn says, “including Hawkman (Aldis Hodge), Doctor Fate (Brosnan), Cyclone (Quintessa Swindell), and Atom Smasher (Noah Centineo). Not to mention the number of characters and worlds Black Adam touches.

For each of these actors, it made this experience particularly formative, knowing that they have the chance to become generational stars if the hugely ambitious film fulfills its potential.

Johnson, who created an environment in which people from very different backgrounds felt safe to be with each other, was key to a great performance.

“It’s the greatest blessing,” Swindell says. “I felt so supported in this process, especially by Dwayne. He is so friendly and he really listens. He makes people feel really special.

Johnson’s kindness was invaluable, but it was his tireless commitment that got everyone going from the first moment.

“I’ll give you an example,” Garcia said. “We had an idea of ​​what Black Adam should look like, and with that in mind, Dwayne spent two years on a training program to physically embody this character. And that’s in addition to the research he did for his ‘immersing himself in the comic book story of Black Adam. It was a colossal undertaking, but his drive and focus were paramount. His wit, mana and devotion are second to none.

Johnson and Co. also took steps to ensure the character’s Arabic roots were respected, although the film shifted its Egyptian comic book origins to the fictional Arab town of Kahndaq. Amer – the creator and star of Netflix’s semi-autobiographical hit series “Mo” – has long been outspoken about Arab portrayal and assured that he would not be a token character fitting into Arab stereotypes. Instead, he is the heart of the film.

“Not only did he smash that role, he also became one of our most trying characters. His comedic nature provided the perfect amount of levity to a film that we rooted in edge and darkness. audience will love it,” says Flynn.

“We were really trying to create something powerful and new and fresh,” says Amer. “There was never a symbolic Arabic joke that I had to change. Everyone was aware from day one. It was so refreshing. I can’t even tell you. I get emotional because I I’ve been in this game for a long time. In every way, I’ve never experienced anything like it. It’s really amazing.

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Viral dance group Quick Style set to conquer Dubai and the world https://sahnobar.com/viral-dance-group-quick-style-set-to-conquer-dubai-and-the-world/ Thu, 13 Oct 2022 05:33:33 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/viral-dance-group-quick-style-set-to-conquer-dubai-and-the-world/ In June this year, clips of a ragtag crew of boys performing to a mostly Bollywood hit medley at a Pakistani wedding in Oslo, Norway went viral on TikTok and Instagram. While song and dance celebrations are a mainstay of most South Asian weddings, the band’s sheer skill, finesse of movement and boundless energy have […]]]>

In June this year, clips of a ragtag crew of boys performing to a mostly Bollywood hit medley at a Pakistani wedding in Oslo, Norway went viral on TikTok and Instagram.

While song and dance celebrations are a mainstay of most South Asian weddings, the band’s sheer skill, finesse of movement and boundless energy have proven to be addictive to watch, propelling them to worldwide fame.

The diversity of the dancers – all of Norwegian nationality but of different ethnic origins – created a curious but fascinating spectacle. Their effortless blending of different cultural identities into a universally appealing performance has also made them a pop culture phenomenon.

But the boys themselves were no ordinary wedding guests. They are professional dancers and choreographers called Quick Style and performed at the wedding of one of the group’s founders, Suleman Malik.

Quick Style will perform on Friday as part of Coke Studio Live in Dubai. Ahead of their Middle Eastern debut, the band performed one of their famous “Takeovers of the City” in Dubai on Sunday, during which they performed their viral Kala Chashma routine at the foot of Burj Khalifa, with hundreds of adoring fans cheering them on.

A journey of dance and discovery

TikTok fans might know Quick Style from their Famous Wedding Show 2022 viral video, which now has nearly 80 million views on YouTube, but the group’s founders, Pakistani-Norwegian twins Suleman and Bilal Malik, and their Thai-Norwegian friend Nasir Sirikhan, all 31, are no strangers to stardom .

Their journey to world fame has been long and passionate in the world of dance.

The trio first met at school in their early teens in Oslo and say they weren’t particularly good dancers, “but just interested in music videos and cool stuff like most children”.

“We were inspired by a dance community in Oslo. So we started taking classes together and grew together,” says Bilal. The National.

Over time, they have attended workshops led by international dancers and say they have trained with some of the best choreographers in the world.

“We started doing shows, battles, things like that and people liked us, and we slowly started winning competitions.”

Their breakthrough came in 2009 when they won Norway’s biggest national talent competition, Norske Talenter Where Norway has talent, leading Sony Music to sign them as their first non-musician artists. This led to the start of their touring and stage careers, as well as international dance workshops.

In 2009, using the prize money of Norske Talenterthe friends start their own dance studio in Oslo, Quick Style.

“Long story short, we realized the spaces we were practicing in weren’t suitable for professional dance, so we rented our own space and built the studio from scratch,” says Sirikhan.

“But when the rents started going up, we started offering classes for certain incomes. That was the original idea behind it, but it grew into something much bigger and the dance school and the most thriving community in Norway today, it is a creative home and an outlet for many young people.

Quick Style has since gone on to choreograph for top K-pop group BTS. Their first official dance for the group is Save mefollowed by blood sweat tears.

But it was their routine for Boy with Luvthe official 2019 music video that earned them award nominations. The music video has been viewed 1.5 billion times on YouTube at the time of writing.

In 2017, they also appeared on the dance world TV show, for which Jennifer Lopez was one of the judges, with a mind-blowing, highly technical and synchronized routine.

In 2020, while participating in America has talent: the champions, they were eliminated quickly with the dreaded “X” buzzer. But it was a learning experience, says Sirikhan.

“It made us realize that we were designing and delivering our shows to people in the dance industry,” he says. “But now it’s more about entertaining a general audience. Through our craft, we aim to build bridges, make people smile and make people happy.

A product of their time

While their dancing primarily focuses on urban and hip-hop, the group says their dance style is as eclectic as their backgrounds.

“Growing up in Norway, we had a very broad perspective. We learned about European dance styles and are part of the community here, but growing up in Desi/Asian homes we were also exposed to this culture,” says Suleman.

“When we started learning dance, we were obsessed with hip-hop, but also learning Asian styles – Japanese and Korean – as well. So we soaked up all the influences: Asian, American, Europeans.

“Americans taught us about synchronization, urban and R&B styles, Asians focus on technique and European style is more individual. From there we started to develop our own style, but our style comes from everything… all these different influences that we grew up with.

In this way, Quick Style embodies a very 21st century phenomenon.

“The beginning of our interest in dance coincided with the launch of YouTube, and before social media became so important, we were inspired by the movies, the culture, our homes, all the experiences of vacationing in the country of “Our parents’ origin. A lot of our references even come from video games we’ve played and our favorite characters,” says Sirikhan.

Even their name, Quick Style, is inspired by Kvikk Lunsj, their favorite chocolate bar (“the Norwegian Kit-Kat”, as Bilal calls it) that they snacked on while thinking of what to call themselves.

“Everything is a source of inspiration,” says Bilal. “It is indeed the time right now, as the whole world is connected through social media and devices. It is the same for us: we are a product of the times in which we live.

Giving voice through dance

But back to their viral wedding video and its universal appeal, which Sirikhan says comes down to their “personal vibe.”

“You could see we were all friends for a long time,” he says. “You can see the joy and genuine fun we had while performing. That, along with the song choices, the presence of professional dancers, and our sheer ethnic diversity – people don’t expect to see that combination and see the unexpected is part of what makes things go viral.

Bilal says he is proud of the diversity of the group. “Our dance studio in Oslo has about 250 active members. Norway is so diverse, we have rich and poor students, children who get dropped off in their cars and those who have to take the bus for an hour, but when they get here we become a community regardless and the wedding video was the result of that,” he says.

“The boys in it are a mix of Norwegian, Pakistani, Indian, Albanian, Moroccan, Thai, Filipino… but our world is one.”

In 2019, Quick Style was named a Unicef ​​Goodwill Ambassador of Norway, working to reduce racism as part of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goal #10: Reduce Inequality.

“We worked for inclusivity with immigrants coming to Norway, fleeing war or other difficult situations,” says Sirikhan.

“Our job as ambassadors was to show people that you can be Norwegian even if you’re not blond or blue-eyed. Being born and raised in Norway and enjoying everything we’re doing right now , here and abroad, simply shows the possibilities for young people.

In the years to come, the group aims to have studios all over the world, including one in Dubai.

“There is a lot of talent in the UAE. We have great confidence in that,” Suleman says.

Coke Studio Live, featuring top performers from the hit Pakistani show, is set to take place at the Coca-Cola Arena on Friday. Tickets cost from 179 Dh and are available on coca-cola-arena.com

Updated: October 13, 2022, 8:43 p.m.

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Open Call Announced to Participate in GNO Learning & Participation Cross-Cultural Dance Group https://sahnobar.com/open-call-announced-to-participate-in-gno-learning-participation-cross-cultural-dance-group/ Fri, 07 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/open-call-announced-to-participate-in-gno-learning-participation-cross-cultural-dance-group/ The GNO Learning & Participation Intercultural Dance Group invites dancers of all ethnicities with extensive experience in different types of dance (such as hip hop, break dance, Latin, Indian, traditional dances from different parts of the world , contemporary dance, etc.) to register their participation in order to become its new members. This season, the […]]]>

The GNO Learning & Participation Intercultural Dance Group invites dancers of all ethnicities with extensive experience in different types of dance (such as hip hop, break dance, Latin, Indian, traditional dances from different parts of the world , contemporary dance, etc.) to register their participation in order to become its new members.

This season, the Intercultural Dance Group continues its methodology and research on movement by bringing together traditional and contemporary techniques while highlighting the particularities of the aesthetics of different dance traditions. The main objectives are to strengthen the already existing group and to give it the possibility of integrating new tools and methods in its functioning on the one hand, and to welcome new members from other fields of dance and to integrate new influences in the pool of our research. process on the other hand.

Applications for participation in intercultural dance will be accepted exclusively through the form that you will find here until 21/10/2022.

For a limited number of participants.

Confirmation date until: 28/10/2022

Planning/Direction: Polina Kremasta (choreographer)

Assistant to the choreographer: Thenia Antoniadou

Starts: October 31, 2022

Duration: From 31/10/2022 to 29/05/2023

Day & Time: every Monday, 6.00 – 9.00 p.m.

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The Mark Morris Dance Group’s 2022-2023 touring season will feature THE LOOK OF LOVE and more https://sahnobar.com/the-mark-morris-dance-groups-2022-2023-touring-season-will-feature-the-look-of-love-and-more/ Thu, 06 Oct 2022 13:18:20 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/the-mark-morris-dance-groups-2022-2023-touring-season-will-feature-the-look-of-love-and-more/ The Mark Morris Dance Group (MMDG) will resume their national tour for their 2022-2023 season, with ten stops confirmed nationwide from October 2021 to June 2022. The touring season is centered around Mark Morris’ new BOLD creation , The gaze of love. The new one-night work co-commissioned by a national consortium of arts presenters features […]]]>

The Mark Morris Dance Group (MMDG) will resume their national tour for their 2022-2023 season, with ten stops confirmed nationwide from October 2021 to June 2022. The touring season is centered around Mark Morris’ new BOLD creation , The gaze of love. The new one-night work co-commissioned by a national consortium of arts presenters features more than a dozen legendary Burt Bacharach hits arranged by longtime musical collaborator Ethan Iverson. The season also includes two quintessential evening works from the MMDG repertoire: Pepperland and The Hard Nut.

The 2021-2022 season kicks off October 20-23, 2022 at BroadStage in Santa Monica, Calif., with the world premiere of The Look of Love, which will be presented on six subsequent legs of the tour at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts (Washington, DC), Gogue Performing Arts at Auburn University (Auburn, AL), Modlin Center for the Arts at University of Richmond (Richmond, VA), Cal Performances, UC Berkeley (Berkeley, CA ), Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign (Urbana, IL), and UC Santa Barbara Arts & Lectures (Santa Barbara, CA). Pepperland (2019) will be performed at Performance Santa Fe (Santa Fe, NM) and George Mason University’s College of Visual and Performing Arts (Manassas, VA), and MMDG’s holiday production, The Hard Nut (1991) , will make its first appearance in Detroit at the Detroit Opera (Detroit, MI).

Full season information, including performance locations, dates, times and repertoire, as well as ticketing links are available at mmdg.org/season. Ticket availability and prices vary by location.

The tour for the 2022-2023 season includes:

BroadStage (Santa Monica, CA)

October 20-23, 2022

The gaze of love

John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts (Washington, DC)

October 26-29, 2022

The gaze of love

Gogue Performing Arts at Auburn University (Auburn, AL)

November 8, 2022

The gaze of love

Detroit Opera (Detroit, MI)

December 3-4, 2022

hard nut

Modlin Center for the Arts (Richmond, Virginia)

January 27, 2023

The gaze of love

Performance Santa Fe (Santa Fe, New Mexico)

February 7, 2023

pepperland

Hylton Performing Arts Center at George Mason University (Manassas, VA)

February 11, 2023

pepperland

Cal Performances, UC Berkeley (Berkeley, CA)

February 17-19, 2023

The gaze of love

Krannert Center for the Performing Arts (Urbana, IL)

April 14-15, 2023

The gaze of love

UC Santa Barbara Arts and Lectures (Santa Barbara, CA)

May 6, 2023

The gaze of love

Note: Programs and dates are subject to change. Please visit our website at mmdg.org/season for the latest information. Other tour dates will be announced.

Mark Morris has been hailed as “the most successful and influential living choreographer, and unquestionably the most musical” (New York Times). In addition to having created more than 150 works for the Mark Morris Dance Group, he conducts orchestras, directs operas and choreographs for ballet companies around the world. Morris’ work is acclaimed for its ingenuity, musicality, wit and humanity. Named a Fellow of the MacArthur Foundation in 1991, he has to date received eleven honorary doctorates and a multitude of awards, including the Samuel H. Scripps/American Dance Festival Award for Lifetime Achievement, the Leonard Bernstein Lifetime Achievement Award for the Elevation of Music in Society, the Benjamin Franklin Laureate Prize for Creativity, the Cal Performances Award of Distinction in the Performing Arts, the Orchestra of St. Luke’s Gift of Music Award and the 2016 Doris Duke Artist Award. Morris’ memoir, Out Loud, co- written with Wesley Stace, were published in paperback by Penguin Press in October 2021.

About Mark Morris Dance Group and MMDG Music Ensemble

Founded in New York in 1980 by artistic director and choreographer Mark Morris, hailed by The New York Times as “the most successful and influential living choreographer, and unquestionably the most musical”, the Mark Morris Dance Group has been called “leading modern dance organization of our time” (Yo-Yo Ma). Its members have received “highest praise for their technical poise, musicality and sheer human authenticity”. (Bloomberg News). live and community involvement are essential parts of the Mark Morris Dance Group, which has toured with its own musicians, the MMDG Music Ensemble, since 1996. The Mark Morris Dance Center, which opened in Brooklyn in 2001, is the Dance Group’s headquarters .and provides educational opportunities in dance and music for people of all ages and abilities.

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