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Dance group accused of donning BLACKFACE for performing Haka on Bollywood song

White Czech dancers are accused of “racism” and “cultural appropriation” after performing a ceremonial haka with imitation Maori tattoos – as critics say, it’s the equivalent of ” black”

  • A group of women in the Czech Republic were filmed dancing to a Bollywood song
  • Choreographer Jarmila Chromíková posted a clip on Instagram with #bollyhaka
  • Responses accused the group of “blackface” and cultural appropriation










A group of white Czech dancers have been accused of racism and cultural appropriation after a video was released showing them performing a ceremonial haka with imitations of Maori tattoos painted on their faces.

The original footage was uploaded to Instagram by self-proclaimed Bollywood dancer and choreographer Jarmila Chromíková, who shared it with the caption: “When Girls Have Haka on the Hook” with hashtags including #bollyhaka, #facepainting, #dancefusion and #newzealandinspiration.

It was picked up by social media users, including Shaneel Lal, who denounced the behavior “dangerous” and “blatantly racist” in a post shared with 37,000 Instagram followers.

The sentiment was echoed by critics, including Maori cultural advisor Karaitiana Taiuru, who told the New Zealand Herald that the performance was the equivalent of a “blackface”.

A group of white Czech dancers have been accused of racism and cultural appropriation after a video was released showing them performing a ceremonial haka with imitations of Maori tattoos painted on their faces. Their photos were shared on Instagram by Shaneel Lal

A group of women (pictured) in the Czech Republic have been criticized for performing a Haka on a Bollywood song, while wearing black face paint

A group of women (pictured) in the Czech Republic have been criticized for performing a Haka on a Bollywood song, while wearing black face paint

He said the video “represents an emerging trend in online caricature depicting Maori as wild, uneducated and aggressive people, disguised in humor in the same way that Black Face is / was for African Americans.”

“This is blatant racism that frankly affects all Maori and especially Maori who choose to revive our ancient customs of facial tattoos called Ta Moko (men) and Moko Kauae (women).”

Meanwhile, Shaneel shared a long caption on his Instagram account saying, “A group of white women got together and did the“ BOLLYHAKA. ”In other words, wearing the black face and doing the Haka on Bollywood songs.

“The absolute daring of these colonists. @jarmila_chromikova what kind of behavior is this? It is no longer innocent behavior – it is blatant racism. It’s dangerous.

“Sometimes they imitate cultural tattoos and other times they put the face black and call it ‘bad makeup’.

Self-proclaimed Bollywood dancer Jarmila Chromíková took to Instagram to share the images with hashtags including #bollyhaka, #facepainting, #dancefusion and #newzealandinspiration

Self-proclaimed Bollywood dancer Jarmila Chromíková took to Instagram to share the images with hashtags including #bollyhaka, #facepainting, #dancefusion and #newzealandinspiration

Shaneel Lal, who has nearly 37,000 subscribers, accused the dancers of blackface and explained how it can reinforce negative stereotypes

Shaneel Lal, who has nearly 37,000 subscribers, accused the dancers of blackface and explained how it can reinforce negative stereotypes

“Blackface is part of a story of dehumanization, denial of citizenship, and efforts to excuse and justify state violence. From lynchings to mass incarceration, whites have used Blackface (and the resulting dehumanization) as part of his moral and legal justification for violence.

“It is time to stop with contemptuous arguments those who describe these offensive acts as jokes, ignorance and juvenile indiscretions.”

A flood of responses criticized the group, with one writing: “Dude, this is downright offensive! Where is your looking girls? Do you even know what these marks mean? Even all the dancing isn’t clean and it really looks like you all are trying to laugh.

Another said: “It’s disgusting! Focus on your own cultures before you start tampering with other people’s cultures’

A stream of responses to the thread accused the group of not doing their research before filming the performance

A stream of responses to the thread accused the group of not doing their research before filming the performance

However, others argued that the video was insensitive to Maori culture, but said the dancers did not make faces black and did not intend to be racist.

One person wrote: “It’s bad as hell… but it’s not a blackface though… the makeup that’s been done on white women is what Polynesians do as a cultural practice. But yes, IT’S A NO NO ‘

Another said: “It is not the same as the black face, it is b ******* and should not be done, but it is not the same as the black face , that’s a whole different thing. “

A third added: “It’s face paint drawn in different styles, not blackface, just because you mark your face with black paint doesn’t mean it’s blackface.”

Others said the dancers did not wear black faces but still offend Maori culture

Others said the dancers did not wear black faces but still offend Maori culture

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Diversity’s Jordan Banjo reveals dance group is making documentary

Diversity star Jordan Banjo has revealed that a documentary about the dance troupe is in the works.

Speaking on his Kiss FM breakfast show, Jordan, 28, said: “We’ve had conversations about this. It’s about finding the right people to do it and giving yourself plenty of time to sort yourself out properly.

He added, “We’re going to put on an 80 date tour and then bring in a film crew. Let’s make sure it’s entertaining.

Exciting: Diversity star Jordan Banjo, 28, revealed a documentary about the dance troupe is in the works

The beloved dad was in conversation with his co-host and diversity member Perri Kiely, who added: “That would be really cool. It would be nice to watch online, like something on YouTube.”

Jordan also spoke about the difficulties of filming a “fly-on-the-wall” documentary.

He continued, “The hardest part is, when there is always so much going on, how do you integrate them?

“Things flying on the wall aren’t just flying on the wall, are they?” It takes longer – and you want it to be done right. ‘

Perri, 25, agreed, saying, “You can see the inner workings. There is so much more than it looks.

Make the headlines: In September, Diversity made headlines after their dance inspired by Britain's Got Talent BLM became the second most-denounced TV moment in the past 10 years

Make the headlines: In September, Diversity made headlines after their dance inspired by Britain’s Got Talent BLM became the second most-denounced TV moment in the past 10 years

In September, Diversity made headlines after their dance inspired by Britain’s Got Talent BLM became the second most-denounced TV moment in the past 10 years.

Directed by Ashley Banjo, Diversity opened its performance by reciting a viral poem The Great Realization by singer Tomfoolery, about the BLM movement and police brutality.

During their performance, the group also recounted the murder of George Floyd at the hands of police officer Derek Chauvin who put his knee on his neck in Minneapolis on May 25 for nearly nine minutes.

The flood of complaints placed the controversial routine just steps from Celebrity Big Brother’s “punchgate” which received 25,237 objections in 2018, after Roxanne Pallett falsely accused Ryan Thomas of hitting her.

It comes after Ashley, 32, said he was “massively proud” of his band’s Black Lives Matter dance routine after receiving a BAFTA nomination.

Appearing on Saturday night at the Jonathan Ross Show, the dancer tackled the impressive routine.

He told host Jonathan, 60: “It was controversial, made a lot of people unhappy, but it also made a lot of people proud. This sparked a lot of conversations that needed to take place.

Proud: Diversity star Ashley Banjo, 32, said he was

Proud: Diversity star Ashley Banjo, 32, said he was “just extremely proud” of her band’s Black Lives Matter dance routine after receiving a BAFTA nomination

He added: “This performance, it changed my life, it was amazing.

“To potentially win a Bafta for something that was controversial when it shouldn’t have been, it will be something that will stay with me for the rest of my life.”

Ashley also discussed the negative comments the routine received.

Speaking of the controversy, the beloved father said, “We thought it would ruffle a few feathers, but it wouldn’t be one of the most criticized moments of the decade.”

Important: Appearing on Saturday night on the Jonathan Ross Show, the dancer discussed the impressive routine, which took place during Britain's Got Talent in September

Important: Appearing on Saturday night on the Jonathan Ross Show, the dancer discussed the impressive routine, which took place during Britain’s Got Talent in September

He added: “The reaction, even to this day, the online reaction that I get daily is shocking, actually. But I would do it 100 times.

The star also confirmed to host Jonathan that ITV supports diversity.

“They supported him,” he said. “They ran full page ads in the press.

Touchingly, Ashley went on to reveal how much this moment meant to her own father.

“My dad, to see me kneel down in national newspapers across the country.

He told host Jonathan, 60:

He told host Jonathan, 60: “It was controversial, it made a lot of people unhappy, but it also made a lot of people stand up and proud.”

“He was like ‘I was young when they said no blacks, no dogs, no Irish and now I’m watching you in the national press.’

“He was really touched. It is progress. Just seeing his face.

Ashley also spoke about the call he received from Prince Harry and Meghan Markle after the Diversity performance aired.

He said: “We had a very nice conversation. Made me somehow realize, long before their [Oprah] interview, they told me about some things and really opened my eyes to some of the things they had been through.

“I was like, wow, this is real and if anyone figured it out, they figured it out, about where I was, in the middle of a storm.

“It was basically front page news for about three weeks. I still don’t really understand why.

“It was huge and people were talking about it. They said, “Look, we understand what it’s like to receive this kind of negativity.”

There was fury on Tuesday as Britain’s controversial Got Talent Black Lives Matter dance routine was shortlisted for a BAFTA after being nominated by ITV despite being the second most televised moment. criticized for a decade.

Officials have been accused of pursuing a “wakened political agenda” by considering the dance for Virgin Media’s inescapable moment award, where it will now be put to a public vote alongside five other stages.

Powerful: Directed by Ashley, Diversity opened their performance by reciting a viral poem The Great Realization by singer Tomfoolery, about the BLM movement and police brutality

Powerful: Directed by Ashley, Diversity opened their performance by reciting a viral poem The Great Realization by singer Tomfoolery, about the BLM movement and police brutality


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Sarabande dance group promotes creativity and community, adapts to pandemic

Sarabande Dance Ensemble is a student dance collective founded in 1982 that mainly focuses on contemporary, jazz and ballet. The group differs from the nearly 20 other dance groups on campus with its diverse and modern stylistic range, and his commitment to original choreography. His performances and rehearsals are directed and staged by student choreographers who have the freedom to incorporate their individual styles into their pieces.

“We choreograph … and we have ten hours of rehearsal every week”, Helene chwe, a Senior in Sarabande, said of a pre-pandemic semester. “But in those ten hours, there are ten dances, and you can choose how many dances you want to do… so you can choose your engagement.”

Saraband offers many students their first opportunity to choreograph, either by leading open classes or by putting together a complete piece. Dancers can realize their own artistic visions, which was not always possible for students training in a dance studio, according to Chwe.

“Being able to do something that is student-run and super independent, [where] people do exactly what they want to do, it allowed me to relax ”, Chwe said to play with Sarabande. “It was still a show, but it was a lot more fun, because… your friend is choreographing something.”

Second year Hana Tzou says she enjoyed learning from her colleagues Saraband members in a collaborative exchange of movement and technique. Before registering with Tufts, Tzou has danced in the same studio since the age of three and has developed a solid foundation in ballet, tap, jazz and contemporary dance. She described her training as having been quite conservative. Through Saraband, Tzou said she was exposed to more experimental dance settings.

“It’s really fun to try a new style on the body and learn different shapes that you can do” Tzou said. “And it really broadened my dance practice. I think I feel a lot more comfortable dancing in a new style, or even just dancing in my own body because I’m in Sarabande… It really broadened my horizons on what dancing can actually be like .

The pandemic strikes

In March 2020, just a day after the university announced its decision to close the campus in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Saraband held his last performance on stage in person. Chwe described it as memorable and bittersweet.

“I think a lot of people loved how confusing it was because it took all the pressure off of a good performance,” Chwe said. “It was kind of like everyone had stopped caring about dancing and just rocked and dancing for friends… None of the dances were over, but everyone kind of gave their all. “

According to Chwe, tThe club’s booming seniors took advantage of the summer to deliberate on what Sarabande would look like in the 2020-2021 school year, given the restrictions imposed by the pandemic. The club has made its management structure more horizontal; it has gone from having two presidents and smaller sub-committees to an equitable sharing of responsibilities among the six senior members of the club. As co-chair of the interpersonal committee, Chwe is responsible for planning social events and mediating conflicts between members.

Building a community

Organizing social events requires caution when it comes to virus safety and finding community within the social scene in Tufts were especially tough for many early years. Chwe said Saraband managed to plan Breakout Hangouts Across the Class Years, or the dancers have a coffee or relax together.

For freshman Emma Olshin, bonding with the other early years has been one of her favorite times in Sarabande. Olshin described how the new members rented out and decorated a room at Barnum Hall as a surprise birthday party for another member.

“The people of Sarabande are not only my dance teammates, they are also my best friends.

Second year Hana Tzou

“We sent photos to the big [groupchat], and [the upperclassmen] were so happy that we all became friends… Even though we joined together under strange circumstances, we are all close and they know that Sarabande’s future is in our hands. said Olshin.

Tzou echoed a similar appreciation for the authentic community and family the atmosphere she found inside Saraband as soon as she joined.

“I [immediately had this] a whole network of students from the upper class, and even former students who just contacted me and who said to me: “Anything you need, come see us, we can help you” “ said Tzou.

Before the pandemic, dancers often spent time in a off-campus home that has been passed down through generations of Sarabande members and served as a safe space where members can go whenever they want.

“The people of Sarabande are not only my dance teammates, they are also my best friends. said Tzou.

Sarabande also held weekly conversations about the intersections of race and dance. Chwe said his group last semester discussed the oppression of black voices in dance, particularly regarding the implications of the story of exclusion from ballet.

Olshin added that she appreciates the value of such discussions.

“[It’s important] to educate us on the problems of discrimination in the dance world, because there are a lot of them – especially in ballet, which we have all done at some point in our training ”, said Olshin. “So I think it’s really cool that people are motivated to find out more, and I’ve definitely learned a lot from that so far. ”

Adapt to performance in the event of a pandemic

Typically, Saraband, which is made up of no more than 20 dancers, organizes recruitments and hearings at the start of each semester. Last fall, after conducting a series of virtual auditions, which required three separate video submissions, Sarabande welcomed into its group five first years and a second year among the more than 20 people who auditioned. Chwe noted that the group had not anticipated as much interest and that compared to previous years the addition of six new members was relatively large.

Since Sarabande can’t put on a full show in person this year, she has adapted by adopting video performances. Their last performance, “Fluorescent,” was a 34-minute compilation of 10 dances choreographed by different members of Sarabande. Each dance was performed with a different style and mood achieved through a variety of video editing techniques. Some dances were performed outdoors by masked and socially distant members, while others consisted of assembled segments of individually recorded videos. According to Tzou, the university imposed stricter rules while the group was filming for the performance, which resulted in variations between playing together and alone.

For Tzou, transforming his shared dormitory in a space conducive to dancing was a source of frustration.

“The only thing a dancer needs to dance is space” said Tzou. “To have that taken away, for me, it was really difficult.”

When possible, the group performs repetitions in Jackson Gym, reserved classrooms or outside, even when temperatures have dropped. Even then Tzou added that the lack of access to mirrors, as is customary in typical dance studios, presented another difficulty.

“I feel a lot more comfortable in my body and I have more confidence in myself when I can see myself in the mirror” said Tzou. After two semesters, Tzou said she had gotten used to dancing without a mirror, trusting her instincts and the choreographers’ comments to guide her.

According to Tzou, performing in pre-recorded videos gave the choreographers more freedom to experiment by engaging with a new medium, incorporating camera movements and cuts to transition between formations or add extra textural quality to the performance.

Even so, for the dancers, there is a lot to be missed about the stage performance experience.

“Everyone at Sarabande was in a way brought up for the stage” said Tzou. “I know the majority of people really miss the performing aspect, because there’s just something so exciting about being on stage, your friends are in the audience, they’re cheering you on. This adrenaline rush is so good.

All members of Sarabande have the chance to choreograph. Even new members, like Olshin, had the opportunity to choreograph and teach open classes. Olshin said she especially liked that the open classes gave her the opportunity to share smaller combinations of choreography without needing to create an entire three-minute routine.

“I taught more technique… doing things on the floor or a workout or stretching, or I could do a little combo – I can really do whatever I want,” said Olshin. “People are ready for anything. People can come, they can’t come, it’s very relaxed this semester.

The laid back spirit of Saraband continues to maintain itself as creative and collaborative dance collective who supports his dancers, many of which come from competitive dance circles. Tzou and Olshin entered university with the intention of continuing to dance; everyone researched all the active dance groups at Tufts and felt drawn to Saraband. Chwe, on the other hand, had initially considered taking a step back from dancing, who had consumed a large part of his late childhood, but she eventually felt compelled to join Sarabande after attending an open class in her first year.

“I think they do a really good job of drawing on everyone’s skills, never forcing people to do what they’re not comfortable with in dancing, but also really highlighting what people are really good at. ” said Tzou. “It’s super collaborative. It’s just really wonderful.


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101Doll Squadron ‘Twerking’ Dance Group Criticizes ABC’s ‘Misleading’ Cut

The dance troupe that twerked in front of a brand new warship to celebrate its unveiling criticized the ABC for making it “misleading”.

Dancers from 101Doll Squadron say they feel “threatened, exploited and endangered” amid widespread criticism over decision to use their racy routine as part of ceremony used to launch $ 2 billion HMAS Supply in Sydney on Saturday.

The band members performed ahead of the arrival of Governor General David Hurley and Defense Forces Chief Angus Campbell – but the CBA edited the footage to make it look like these dignitaries were watching their racy routine.

“We found this very scary and are giving more thought to the ABC camera operator and their need to sexualize these women and their dance piece for their own satisfaction,” the group said in a statement.

The troop – which is made up of indigenous and multiracial members – said they had no intention of disrespecting and insisted the images were taken out of context.

Daily Mail Australia has contacted the ABC for comment.

Governor General David Hurley (pictured wearing glasses) was seated at the front and center of the ceremony – but attended after the dance performance

Previously, former soldier turned politician Jacqui Lambie called the decision to use the suggestive dance “absolute shock”.

“I thought I was watching the Super Bowl over there for a split second, I’m going to be honest with you,” she told Nine’s Today.

“Whoever made this call, it’s an absolute shock for God’s sake.”

Senator Lambie added: “It’s good that these young women came out, but I’m telling you, being half-dressed on the outside of a warship is probably inappropriate.

“If this is the leadership of our defense forces, may God help our sons and daughters who serve. “

Another former soldier-turned-politician, LNP member for Herbert Philip Thompson, said the military’s attempts to be more contemporary and inclusive were ill-conceived.

“ADF standards, and certainly when commissioning a ship, should be a little higher than that,” he told the ABC earlier this week.

“Our ADF should not be on the left or on the right; they should be at the heart of their work, and their job is to defend our nation, our interests, our values, our sovereignty, but also when we go on operations, have aggression and violence without excuse to carry out the mission. ‘

He added: “We have woken up a bit in the last few years and we cannot afford to do this.”

Videos from the event show seven women performing a choreography as they were dressed in black shorts, crop tops and red berets.

HMAS Supply's new navy vessel launched by 101Doll Squadron (pictured) at Woolloomooloo in Sydney

HMAS Supply’s new Navy ship was launched by a group of scantily clad women twerk (pictured) at Woolloomooloo in Sydney

The HMAS supply ship company stands on the upper decks at the end of its commissioning ceremony (pictured on Saturday)

The HMAS supply ship company stands on the upper decks at the end of its commissioning ceremony (pictured on Saturday)

The launch was attended by officials including the Governor General and the Chief of the Navy

The launch was attended by officials including the Governor General and the Chief of the Navy

Some social media commentators agreed the dance move was too suggestive for an official government event.

“It doesn’t matter who the girls are, it’s not appropriate,” one person said.

“At a time when we are promoting the right of women not to be objectified, there are other dance moves that would be fun and just as energetic.”

Other commentators found the incident “bizarre”.

“I definitely wouldn’t believe you if the HMAS Supply banner wasn’t visible in the background. It’s … too strange, said one of them.

“It’s an interpretive dance, telling how the Navy doesn’t have the budget to organize proper entertainment for this ship launch after spending all its money on submarines,” another joked.

The defense said the dance was organized in order to

The defense said the dance was organized in order to “engage with the local community”

Governor General David Hurley (pictured) arrives at the ceremony for the new $ 2 billion boat on Saturday

Governor General David Hurley (pictured) arrives at the ceremony for the new $ 2 billion boat on Saturday

A defense spokesperson told Daily Mail Australia the dance was organized to engage with the local community and precedes the formal part of the ceremony.

“HMAS Supply and the Royal Australian Navy are committed to working with Australians from all walks of life to actively support local charities and community groups,” they said.

“The dance was performed prior to the commencement of commissioning formalities and prior to the arrival of His Excellency the Governor General, Chief of the Navy and Commander of the Australian Fleet.”

The key role of HMAS Supply is to provide support to naval combat units. The ship will now undergo testing.

What will the HMAS supply be used for?

HMAS Supply is the lead ship of two Supply Supply Vessels being built for the Royal Australian Navy by Spanish shipbuilder Navantia.

Australian Supply Class ships are based on the Cantabria Class design of the Spanish Navy.

The ships are intended to carry fuel, dry cargo, water, food, ammunition, equipment and spare parts to provide operational support to deployed naval or combat forces operating away from port in high seas for longer periods.

In addition to refueling, ships can be used to combat environmental pollution at sea, provide logistical support to the armed forces, and support humanitarian and disaster relief operations.

Source: Australian Navy


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High Country Cloggers: Local Dance Group to Represent North Carolina at Presidential Inauguration | Watauga

BOONE – Showcasing a wealth of talent and enthusiasm, an ensemble of High Country dancers will represent North Carolina on the national stage during the presidential inauguration on January 20.

The High Country Cloggers participate in “Parade Across America,” a virtual celebration that takes place during the Presidential Inauguration and will feature performances from communities in all 56 US states and territories.

According to Amber Hendley, director of High Country Dance Studio, the cloggers are thrilled to be able to share their talents on such a big stage, unlike any other they have performed on before.

“They’re so excited they can’t believe they can be a part of something like this,” Hendley said. “It’s not so much a question of political position, it’s that we like to obstruct ourselves. So now we can show the world what we love to do on a national platform, which is great. “

Dubbed North Carolina’s oldest tourist attraction, Watauga County’s famous Blowing Rock served as the backdrop for the High Country Cloggers’ pre-recorded performance. Working with the producers of the events via Zoom, a videographer from the College of Art and Design of Savannah and a little help from Blowing Rocks Mayor Charlie Sellers, the dance group captured on film the essence of the High Country by combining the musical culture of the Appalachians with the natural beauty of the region.

“I was trying to figure out where our best location would be and everything worked out. I went and asked Charlie if we could play and sure enough he said ‘absolutely’, ”said Hendley. “He made his team clear so that we could have this magnificent setting. “

Founded over 25 years ago by Hendley’s mother, Vanessa Minton, the High Country Dance Studio has served not only as a creative outlet for the region’s youth, but also as a vehicle to build trust and create links with the community. The tradition of patching has been passed down to Hendley from her mother and is a legacy she hopes to continue to share with others in the future.

“It’s much more than performing on stage; it’s building their confidence, it’s building relationships, it’s building lifelong friendships. Some of my best friends are girls I danced with when I was 5 or 6, ”said Hendley. “Clogging being the dance of the state of North Carolina and also the High Country and the Appalachians, it’s such an art that few can say they know how to do it. But I was fortunate enough to learn how to do it thanks to my mother and this commitment.

The High Country Cloggers will share their bit of High Country culture alongside other virtual performances by groups such as the New York Fire Department and EMS Emerald Society Pipes and Drums representing New York State, the Chinese Cultural Arts Center representing Delaware. and the MA Foreign War Veterans Honor Guard representing Massachusetts.


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Mark Morris Dance Group Launches On-Demand Video Collections Of Old Works

In its ongoing efforts to engage audiences through online programming while theaters remain closed, the Mark Morris Dance Group (MMDG) will be showing full-length works by Mark Morris this summer. Dance on! Video Vault: Curated Collections from the Mark Morris Dance Group Archive is a

series of archival collections that offer a rare chance to rediscover the dances of MMDG’s early years with introductions moderated by Morris himself.

To date Morris has choreographed 185 works, some of which have only been performed a handful of times, or for which there are only one or two performances on video. Through this series, MMDG highlights works that are less well-known and much less shown than some of the Dance Group’s most iconic dances.

Each month this summer, MMDG will release a different collection of integral works from its archives selected by archivist Stephanie Neel.

Released on June 23, the first collection, The Early Years, will be available on demand until July 19 and includes three dances from the 1980s: Dad’s Charts, Canonic ¾ Studies and Strict Songs. Each dance is prefaced by a video introduction by Mark Morris.

Dad’s Charts, the inaugural performance of the Mark Morris Dance Group, is a solo that Morris premiered at the Cunningham Dance Foundation in November 1980. Set on the recording of “Robbins’ Nest” by Illinois Jacquet, the dance is a structured improvisation in jazz referring to scenes from the life of Morris’s father: playing the keyboard, bowling, falling asleep in front of the TV.

Morris created Canonic ¾ Studies (1982) on the students of his summer workshop at On the Boards in Seattle. On an assortment of piano waltzes, the work focuses on the amplitude of movement in relation to time. The video included in this collection is of a performance from December 1983 at the Dance Theater Workshop.

Strict Songs (1987) marked the first of many collaborations between Morris and composer Lou Harrison. Morris choreographed this work to Harrison’s “Four Strict Songs” for ten dancers. It was created with the Pacific Northwest Chamber Ensemble and over 100 members of the Seattle Men’s Chorus. Performance in the collection is that of MMDG at the Brooklyn Academy of Music with the St. Luke’s Orchestra and the New York City Gay Men’s Chorus in May 1988.

Subsequent collections, available on request on July 20 and August 24 respectively, include The Brussels Years, 1988-1991 and Solo Works, 1980-1989.

The recordings of these performances were digitized between 2017 and 2020 with funding from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to preserve the works on paper and audiovisual media of the Mark Morris Dance Group.

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, MMDG has canceled all in-person programs until further notice. Dance on! Video Vault is its latest digital offering, bringing together remotely created video dances, live and on-demand video lessons, performance clips, documentaries, interviews with Mark Morris and dancers, and behind-the-scenes reporting.

Dance on! Video Vault: Curated collections from the Mark Morris Dance Group Archives, On-Demand monthly archival collections of lesser-known works by Mark Morris, starting with The Early Years Collection through July 19, 2020 at the address https://markmorrisdancegroup.org/dance- sur-vidéo-vault /


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Korean dance group performs neck-deep in water tanks by the water’s edge

A Korean dance group will climb into human-sized reservoirs filled with water tonight and encourage their audience on Wellington’s waterfront to join them.

Elephants Laugh will perform neck-deep in the water, exploring themes of inclusion, diversity, and what it means to be an island nation, as part of the free event The Performance Arcade.

Dancer Yared Kebede, 26, said they have been rehearsing Muljil since last Sunday.

“It’s really exciting to be honest – it’s something you wouldn’t expect.”

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For three nights this week on Wellington's waterfront, a Korean performing group and members of the refugee community will climb into water-filled tanks, encouraging their audiences to do the same.

MONIQUE FORD / STUFF

For three nights this week on Wellington’s waterfront, a Korean performing group and members of the refugee community will climb into water-filled tanks, encouraging their audiences to do the same.

Slipping into the water first – even though it was hot – was always a shock, he said, and he hoped audiences would enjoy the show for its uniqueness.

Director Jinyeob Lee met up with performance arcade art director Sam Trubridge in Korea, who thought it would be a good message for New Zealanders after the Christchurch mosque attacks.

“[Audiences] can’t imagine being refugees, they don’t click, ”Lee said.

Four performers each start in a tank and are joined towards the end by another performer.

Dancers perform neck-deep in the water, exploring themes of inclusion, diversity, and what it means to be an island nation, as part of the free Performance Arcade event.

MONIQUE FORD / STUFF

Dancers perform neck-deep in the water, exploring themes of inclusion, diversity, and what it means to be an island nation, as part of the free Performance Arcade event.

Soon this artist would leave and invite members of the public to climb the tanks themselves.

“We want to trigger relationships with this community, with the local population. We often do participatory performances,” she said.

“I want to have a different relationship. Instead of actor to person, person to person.”

People often thought it was installed, but real strangers stepped forward to climb it.

The group has performed around the world and rehearsing with local members of the refugee community in Wellington since last Sunday.

MONIQUE FORD / STUFF

The group has performed around the world and rehearsing with local members of the refugee community in Wellington since last Sunday.

The Wellingtonians would they be ready to go? “So far, we have never failed,” said Lee.

Performance Arcade is a free annual event that takes place on Wellington’s waterfront until March 1.

Running annually since 2011, an assortment of shipping containers creates an innovative new space for the presentation of the performing arts.

The audience grew to over 90,000 people in 2019.

"We want to trigger relations with this community, with the local population.  We often do participatory performances," said director Jinyeob Lee.

MONIQUE FORD / STUFF

“We want to spark relationships with this community, with the local people. We often do participatory performances,” said director Jinyeob Lee.

* Catch the show at the Performance Arcade behind Te Papa until Sunday 1 at 8:45 p.m. every evening.


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Michael Flatley’s Irish dance group cancels EIGHT shows, flees China earlier

Lord of the Dance star Michael Flatley’s Irish dance group on tour in China have had to cancel their performances in Beijing, fearing they will remain stranded if the rapidly sweeping coronavirus epidemic continues to escalate.

Eight performances of Lord of the Dance: Dangerous Games were scheduled in the Chinese capital but all were canceled at the last minute to give the dancers time to flee the country.

MailOnline understands that the 23-person troop feared they could be stranded in China if authorities chose to lock down more provinces to prevent the spread of the deadly SARS-like infection.

The group are currently in Taiwan – which has also recorded coronavirus cases – for five shows as part of their world tour. The group will travel to Mexico next week before flying to Europe.

The cancellations come as nearly 4,600 people have been stricken by the killer virus. Leading experts today warned that the outbreak – which has claimed at least 106 lives – will continue for several months.

Chinese authorities have already taken the unprecedented step of locking down Hubei – the province at the heart of the epidemic, effectively trapping millions of residents until the virus is gone.

Eight performances of Lord of the Dance: Dangerous Games were scheduled in the Chinese capital but all were canceled at the last minute (pictured, some of the dancers wearing face masks at an airport, believed to be in China)

MailOnline understands that the 23-person troop feared they could be stranded in China if authorities chose to lock down more provinces to prevent the spread of the deadly SARS-like infection (pictured, two of the dancers wearing face masks at an airport)

MailOnline understands that the 23-person troop feared they could be stranded in China if authorities chose to lock down more provinces to prevent the spread of the deadly SARS-like infection (pictured, two of the dancers wearing face masks at an airport)

Lord Of The Dance sensation Michael Flatley directs Dangerous Games performance

Lord Of The Dance sensation Michael Flatley directs Dangerous Games performance

The group are currently in Taiwan - which has also recorded coronavirus cases - for five shows as part of their world tour.  The group will travel to Mexico next week before flying to Europe

The group are currently in Taiwan – which has also recorded coronavirus cases – for five shows as part of their world tour. The group will travel to Mexico next week before flying to Europe

Six members of the Lord of the Dance tour have already spent time in a Beijing hospital due to illness.

Tests later confirmed they had a bacterial infection – they were all cured by taking antibiotics.

Discussing the ordeal, a tour member – who has not been named – told MailOnline: “Seeing the interior of a fever screening clinic in Beijing during a pandemic has been an interesting experience.

“The real pleasure was going through all the checks at the airport and having to explain through the language barrier that the fever, cough, runny nose and headaches were from something other than the coronavirus. “

The group of 23 dancers includes 14 men and 19 women, aged 18 to 25. They had already performed six consecutive sold-out nights in Shanghai.

Their dates in Beijing, hosted at the prestigious National Center for the Performing Arts, were scheduled from Saturday January 26 to Thursday January 30.

Residents of Xikangzhuang, near the border of Shanxi Province, built entire brick walls, apparently to “prevent foreigners from coming to our village”

Japanese authorities are preparing to load various supplies such as face masks onto a charter plane bound for Wuhan at Haneda Airport in Tokyo.  The flight must evacuate Japanese nationals from the Chinese city which has been hit by the outbreak of a deadly new coronavirus

Japanese authorities are preparing to load various supplies such as face masks onto a charter plane bound for Wuhan at Haneda Airport in Tokyo. The flight must evacuate Japanese nationals from the Chinese city which has been hit by the outbreak of a deadly new coronavirus

Pictured is the wall in Xikangzhuang, which is in Hebei - the province surrounding the capital Beijing, where dozens of cases have been recorded

Pictured is the wall in Xikangzhuang, which is in Hebei – the province surrounding the capital Beijing, where dozens of cases have been recorded

A worker wearing a protective suit sprays disinfectant at an office building in Qingdao, east China's Shandong Province, Tuesday, January 28

A worker wearing a protective suit sprays disinfectant at an office building in Qingdao, east China’s Shandong Province, Tuesday, January 28

CORONAVIRUS: WHAT WE KNOW DATE

What is this virus?

The virus has been identified as a new type of coronavirus. Coronaviruses are a large family of pathogens, most of which cause mild respiratory infections such as the common cold.

But coronaviruses can also be fatal. SARS, or Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, is caused by a coronavirus and killed hundreds of people in China and Hong Kong in the early 2000s.

Can he kill?

Yes. 106 people have died so far after testing positive for the virus.

What are the symptoms?

Its symptoms are fever, cough, and difficulty breathing, but some patients have developed pneumonia, a life-threatening infection that causes inflammation of the small air sacs in the lungs. People with the new coronavirus may only have mild symptoms, such as a sore throat. They may assume they have a cold and not see a doctor, experts fear.

How is it detected?

Genetic sequencing of the virus has been disseminated by Chinese scientists to the rest of the world to allow other countries to quickly diagnose potential new cases. This helps other countries respond quickly to epidemics.

To contain the virus, airports detect infected people with temperature checks. But as with any virus, it has an incubation period, which means detection is not always possible because symptoms have not yet appeared.

CLICK HERE TO SEE THE FULL MAILONLINE Q&A ON CORONAVIRUS

In other developments in today’s escalating crisis, a German has become the first person in Europe to catch the virus without even traveling to China.

The unidentified 33-year-old caught the illness in his home country on Jan.21 from a colleague visiting China and later fell ill on his flight home.

She was originally from Shanghai but had recently visited her parents in Wuhan, according to reports.

The German man’s case is one of four – men in Vietnam, Japan and Taiwan have also been infected at home.

Countries around the world are starting to sever ties with China and withdraw their citizens from the crisis-stricken region of Hubei, where the virus emerged in the city of Wuhan.

The Hong Kong leader today held a press conference in which she wore a face mask and said the city will stop all high-speed trains and ferries to the mainland.

In a dramatic intervention, she also announced that Hong Kong would halve the number of flights and stop issuing visas to visitors from China.

In Australia, paramedics wearing hazmat suits were seen at the luxury Peppers Broadbeach hotel on the Gold Coast.

And a Thai health minister admitted today that the country was “unable to stop” the spread of the virus there, where 14 people have been infected.

But China maintains a strong front – President Xi Jinping said today that the nation “will win the battle against the devil’s virus.”

And a Chinese scientist said he believes the epidemic and the “Battle for Wuhan” will peak in 10 days.


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Mark Morris Dance Group 2019-20 Tickets

Pepperland
with live music

Created for the city of Liverpool to celebrate the Beatles’ 50th anniversary Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Group, Pepperland is a joyful demonstration of the choreographic spirit and musicality of Mark Morris. Ethan Iverson’s original score reinvents selections from the iconic 1967 album in bold new arrangements performed by a lively jazz ensemble of trombone, theremin, vocals, saxophone, keyboards and percussion. Morris’s dancers, dressed in a Carnaby Street riot, demonstrate why this dancer is considered “the most successful and influential choreographer alive, and arguably the most musical” (New York Times). It is an evening “not to be missed” for lovers of dance AND contemporary music!

“Critics love ‘Pepperland’ and audiences love it.” – Star Tribune

This activity is made possible by voters in Minnesota through an Operating Support Grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board, through a legislative appropriation of the Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund.


Northrop Season Group Discount: Groups of 10+ save 15% off the original ticket price or 25% for schools and educational groups at Northrop season events. Remember that tickets are always 50% off for children 17 and under when purchased with at least one adult ticket. Simply complete the group ticket booking form.

See more discounts available.


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A review of “What The Moon Pulls” by RE | Dance Group at the Filament Theater

Photo: Matthew Gregory Hollis

Lucy Vurusic Riner’s first evening dance in five years for RE | Dance Group, the ensemble she directs with co-founder Michael Estanich, took place at the Filament Theater in Portage Park from November 21-24, during a series of fairly clear evenings that allowed a view of the moon. During the hour-long performance, Vurusic Riner and the other seven members of the ensemble explored the changing moods and emotions drawn to the phases of the moon as it shoots out the tides and everything in orbit. around our planet (anyone who has worked in the service industry can tell you the very tangible reality of full moon fever). The small but spacious Filament Theater set the right tone for a performance written in sweet vulnerability; three rows of chairs were arranged around the perimeter of the performance area and the dancers came a few inches from the front row as they swept the space.

The room opened with Vurusic Riner alone on stage, supine, limbs stretched gently towards the sky, bathed in a soft spotlight. It ends the same way, and in between moves through a series of short, rapidly changing sections that establish a kind of meta-rhythm for the show. There are a handful of slightly theatrical interludes with excerpts from Linda Beirds’ poem “Lunar Eclipse” scattered among complete ensemble sections, duets, trios and solos. The music, much of which was composed for the show by Mark D. Burns, changed just as frequently, from ambient to lyrical to rhythm. However, the dominant spirit of the piece was tenderness: dancers leaning on each other, occupying themselves, even slightly grooming each other. In fact, sections with movements suggesting fight or conflict did not appear to be as fully realized or engaged as those in which the dancers expressed playfulness, care or respect. Some of the most prominent moments were in the simpler themes – the arms extending from the chest repeatedly in a receptive gesture. I found myself driven the most by the solos (each dancer took one) which allowed the individuality of each member of the ensemble to shine.

In the tarot, the moon indicates intuition and the realm of shadows, and a calm current of darkness and uncertainty runs through the gently communal spirit of “What the Moon Pulls”. In the last moment of the room’s full circle, when Vurusic Riner was once again alone on stage, fingers and toes gently holding up to the sky, she said she was afraid of the vastness that surrounds us all. And yet, as I stepped out onto the moonlit stretch of Milwaukee Avenue into the quietness of Portage Park, what resonated was how in all this vastness, what we have to hold onto is the other. (Sharon Hoyer)

“What the Moon Pulls” at the Filament Theater, 4041 North Milwaukee, November 21-24 at 8pm.


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