Dance ensemble – Sahno Bar http://sahnobar.com/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 04:37:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://sahnobar.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/profile-120x120.png Dance ensemble – Sahno Bar http://sahnobar.com/ 32 32 West African Drumming and Dance Ensemble Dembaya to Perform – Pasadena Weekendr https://sahnobar.com/west-african-drumming-and-dance-ensemble-dembaya-to-perform-pasadena-weekendr/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 13:37:33 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/west-african-drumming-and-dance-ensemble-dembaya-to-perform-pasadena-weekendr/ Ballet Dembaya, a West African drumming and dance ensemble, will perform at Descanso Gardens in La Cañada Flintridge on Wednesday, June 22 for “Music in the Gardens,” featuring live music from different artists over three days this summer. “Music in the Gardens” is from 11 a.m. to 11:45 a.m., with another show from 1 p.m. […]]]>

Ballet Dembaya, a West African drumming and dance ensemble, will perform at Descanso Gardens in La Cañada Flintridge on Wednesday, June 22 for “Music in the Gardens,” featuring live music from different artists over three days this summer.

“Music in the Gardens” is from 11 a.m. to 11:45 a.m., with another show from 1 p.m. to 1:45 p.m., Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.

“Dembaya” means “family dance” in the Soussou language of Guinea – a tribute to their parents, elders and ancestors – in their home. The band’s West African drumming draws inspiration from the sounds of Guinea, Mali, Senegal, Ivory Coast and African American culture.

The show is free with admission.

On Thursday, watch Tres Souls, where beloved Los Angeles artists Rocio Mendoza, Roberto Carlos and Jesus Martinez are joined by artist friends Ray Gudino and Ismael Pineda to serenade the audience with their special renditions of “Bolero.” Tres Souls revives vintage sounds and songs from the 1940s to the 1960s, stylized during the golden age of Mexican cinema.

On Fridays, Quarteto Nuevo fuses Western classical, Eastern European folk, Latin and jazz. Winners of two South Arts Jazz Road Tours grants, the ensemble composed new movements for their Jazz Road Suite celebrating each state visited. Quarteto Nuevo travels a musical journey that begins with Erik Satie and Heitor Villa-Lobos, and takes you to Chick Corea and original compositions.

For more information, call (818) 949-4200 or visit www.descansogardens.org/event/musical-gardens-11h/?instance_id=8892.

Please note that chairs, blankets, outside food and picnics are not permitted.

The Descanso Gardens are located at 1418 Descanso Drive in La Cañada Flintridge.



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Orlyk Ukrainian Folk Dance Ensemble: Representatives of Ukrainian dance in Great Britain https://sahnobar.com/orlyk-ukrainian-folk-dance-ensemble-representatives-of-ukrainian-dance-in-great-britain/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 11:53:59 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/orlyk-ukrainian-folk-dance-ensemble-representatives-of-ukrainian-dance-in-great-britain/ In these desperate times in which Ukraine finds itself, it is more important than ever to spread its culture and heritage. Located in north Manchester is the Ukrainian Cultural Centre, which describes itself as the “hub” of Manchester’s Ukrainian community on its Facebook page. Three days a week it opens its doors to allow people […]]]>

In these desperate times in which Ukraine finds itself, it is more important than ever to spread its culture and heritage.

Located in north Manchester is the Ukrainian Cultural Centre, which describes itself as the “hub” of Manchester’s Ukrainian community on its Facebook page.

Three days a week it opens its doors to allow people to donate items to help the plight of those suffering from the ongoing Russian invasion.

But for two nights a week, the Orlyk dance group calls it home, and they use the center to rehearse their upcoming shows.

Founded in 1949 by Petro Dnistrowyk and named after exiled Ukrainian Cossack leader Pylyp Orlyk, they are one of many Ukrainian dance groups across the UK.

What elevates it above all others, however, is that it is the representative dance ensemble of the Association of Ukrainians in Britain – and has been since its founding 73 years old.

Its members have taken part in a wide variety of performances and events, including festivals, theater productions, weddings and other corporate functions.

One of the most defining moments in the band’s history was a performance in Ukraine which took place on the day the country declared independence from the USSR in 1991.

However, many English people may recognize the set from their appearances on various popular TV shows including Strictly Come Dancing, Britain’s Got Talent and 8 Out Of 10 Cats Does Countdown.

Most recently, some of its members taught Sky Sports News presenter Kyle Walker a traditional Ukrainian dance routine as part of the build-up to the EURO 2020 quarter-final between Ukraine and England.

Bohdan – a British-born Ukrainian who has been with the band for nine years – was one of the people performing that day.

He says: “It was surreal. When you hear the 30 second countdown, you know there is no turning back and millions of people are going to see you dancing on TV and representing Ukraine.

And that is a crucial part of its success: representing and exhibiting Ukrainian culture in the UK and abroad.

Petro – the current leader of the group – said: “It is our duty to perform and present Ukrainian dance, music and song to as many people as possible, and to show different nationalities how Ukrainian culture is rich, dynamic and important.”

But the members do not perceive this responsibility as a pressure at all, perceiving it rather as a source of pride and fulfilment.

One of the band’s musicians – who also goes by the name Petro – calls it a “blessing”.

“It makes you proud,” he says. “You know that you represent not only yourself, but also Ukraine.”

Boryslav’s group in Ukraine when independence was declared in 1991

This pride is reflected in the ensemble’s close bond and unified desire to keep their traditions alive.

Bohdan realizes this is critical to the quality of his performance as a unit.

“We feel this connection because of our Ukrainian heritage,” he says.

“The complicity and the atmosphere are essential to our success. We’re all really good friends who love to dance, and the audience can see that, so it reflects in the performances.

Group leader Petro describes it as “like an extended family” with a “team atmosphere”.

He adds: “Some of the first generation Ukrainians who came to the UK wanted to maintain these traditions.

“The reason he persevered is because subsequent generations tried to keep the band moving forward, to push the expression of culture forward, and to keep performing and dancing.

“It’s important to have something here that’s available for people to get involved.”

The band also incorporates live music into their performances, which is becoming less and less common among other bands of their ilk.

Musicians at the Ukrainian Festival in Toronto, Canada

Mandolinist Petro explains: “It is important from our point of view that the music complements the dance. We can change and adapt to all different situations.

“It becomes a more unique selling point because there are fewer bands able to provide musicians.

“It’s sad, because we have very talented musicians in the Ukrainian community, but we were brought up with it and we’re happy to use it (in our shows).”

Bohdan thinks it “adds a whole new dimension to our performance”, saying, “It changes the feel of the group from just being a dance group to being an entertainment group.”

It recorded an album of traditional Ukrainian songs, with samples of those songs available to listen to on the band’s website, and during the lockdown some of its members recorded a virtual rendition of a Kolomeyka.

Some in-person performances may just be music without the dancers, adding another strand to their brand, making them a bit more marketable.

But in these difficult times for millions of Ukrainians, it is difficult for members of the group to see from afar the atrocities committed by Russian soldiers against many of them in their home country.

Two described it as a “shock”, and another thought it was just “not real” when news of the invasion broke.

They reiterate the message perpetuated by President Zelensky: Ukraine is a peaceful nation that does not want war.

“People just want their freedom, get Russian soldiers out of their country and live a peaceful life.”

Musician Petro has a lot of emotion in his voice when he talks about it.

“I couldn’t believe it at first,” he says. “I thought ‘This is kind of a joke; he’s just trying it out.

“But it’s sad to hear the stories, not just about the soldiers who are dying, but the innocent people and the children who are suffering.”

“Our children can go out in the park, but in Ukraine they have to climb bombed out buildings not knowing if they are going to stand on an unexploded bomb or a mine. That’s not how it should be these days.

“It makes you feel helpless, but the Ukrainian spirit in us is strong and you turn that helplessness into a determination to show the world who we are.”

Group leader Petro adds, “Now more than ever, it is important that we continue to educate and promote our culture through music and dance.

“We want to express our solidarity with Ukraine, so participating in fundraisers and charity events for Ukraine is the least we can do in these difficult times.”

Last month the band performed at an event at De Montfort Hall in Leicester which has so far raised over £25,000 for the Disaster Emergency Committee.

He is organizing many more events in the coming weeks and months to support the official #HelpUkraine emergency appeal, and the importance of his work is deeply felt.

“Doing things like dancing and singing makes people aware of what’s going on and gives them an understanding of the situation,” says Bohdan.

“We just need to keep doing more shows and parades to spread the word about what’s going on and show the culture and heritage that all these soldiers are fighting for.

“That’s probably one of the most crucial points in the band’s existence with everything that’s going on right now.

“If there is a time to show what Ukraine is, it’s now.”

And what better way to do that than by preserving the country’s most important cultural traditions: music, dance and entertainment. Three things that Orlyk provides – and will almost certainly continue to provide in years to come – in abundance.

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Humor and heart featured in Barrington Dance Ensemble’s spring production – Chicago Tribune https://sahnobar.com/humor-and-heart-featured-in-barrington-dance-ensembles-spring-production-chicago-tribune/ Sun, 22 May 2022 19:45:00 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/humor-and-heart-featured-in-barrington-dance-ensembles-spring-production-chicago-tribune/ The diverse styles of the Barrington Dance Ensemble will be showcased during the company’s Spring Production 2022 on June 10-11. Audiences will see everything from the one-act comedy ballet “Graduation Ball” to Eddy Ocampo’s touching MOZheart, set to music by Mozart. Performances are Fridays at 7 p.m. and Saturdays at 2 p.m. at the Barrington […]]]>

The diverse styles of the Barrington Dance Ensemble will be showcased during the company’s Spring Production 2022 on June 10-11.

Audiences will see everything from the one-act comedy ballet “Graduation Ball” to Eddy Ocampo’s touching MOZheart, set to music by Mozart.

Performances are Fridays at 7 p.m. and Saturdays at 2 p.m. at the Barrington High School Auditorium.

The show will open with MOZheart. “It’s an 11-minute piece,” said artistic director Mary Brennan. She said 11 dancers from the Barrington Dance Ensemble will be joined by three dancers from the Chicago Academy.

“The male dancers at the Academy are very excited to be working with Eddy Ocampo,” said Brennan.

“MOZheart is about falling in love,” Ocampo said. “It’s a perfect piece for their springtime engagement because it’s the exciting new chapter of falling in love. It’s joyful, it’s melancholy, it’s fun.

Ocampo reported that the Barrington Dance Ensemble had already done the work. “I’ve choreographed for them several times,” he says. “My relationship with the Barrington Dance Ensemble goes back nearly 30 years. I danced with them for the very first time in 94. I saw the Barrington Dance Ensemble grow and evolve.

This piece will be followed by “Scenes from Childhood”, which Brennan choreographed to Schumann’s “Kinderszenen”. “It’s a whole suite of music that depicts the life of a childhood,” Brennan said. “We have something called ‘Foreign Lands and Peoples’, ‘Catch Me If You Can’, ‘Almost Too Serious.’ Small studies for children. It’s very charming. It takes place at the end of the 18th century. The costumes reflect the period.

Around 70 children from the Barrington Dance Academy will join dancers from the Barrington Dance Ensemble for this work.

The first half of the program will end with two pieces choreographed by Wade Schaaf, “Steam Heat” and “Sing, Sing, Sing”, originally choreographed by Bob Fosse.

“Wade trained with us when he was young,” Brennan noted. “He is now the founder and artistic director of the Chicago Repertory Ballet. He is a very accomplished choreographer. For years he has been coming out and working with our students.

“I’ve compiled a new version of Fosse’s work ‘Steam Heat’ from ‘Pajama Game’ and ‘Sing, Sing, Sing’ from Fosse dancers,” Schaaf said. “They’re as close to Fosse’s original choreography as befits the band. I adapted them to these two groups of dancers. They are energetic and fun pieces in the Fosse style, with lots of original steps.

The second act of the concert will feature the ballet “Graduation Ball”, in which girls from a private girls’ school and boys from a private military academy come together for a ball.

“It’s a very popular one-act ballet. It’s very funny,” Brennan said. The play was directed by Gregory Merriman, who teaches at Illinois State University. Three dancers from the Chicago Academy and two professional dancers, Vernon Gooden and Quint Lattimore, will play the five cadets.

Wade Schaaf is also in “Graduation Ball.” “He’s six and three years old and he’s playing the manager,” Brennan revealed.

“He’s a lovely, caring, sentimental character,” Schaaf said. “She takes care of her daughters at the girls’ school. She has a big love affair with the general of the boys’ academy across the lake.

Schaaf accepted the role because “I always have a great time with comedy in this role. It’s fun to play such a sweet character.

Spring production 2022

When: June 10-11

Or: Barrington Dance Ensemble at Barrington High School Auditorium, 616 W. Main St., Barrington

Tickets: $18-$25

Information: 847-382-6333; barringtondance.org

Myrna Petlicki is a freelance journalist for Pioneer Press.

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Dance ensemble to portray the experience of dementia | Entertainment News https://sahnobar.com/dance-ensemble-to-portray-the-experience-of-dementia-entertainment-news/ Sat, 21 May 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/dance-ensemble-to-portray-the-experience-of-dementia-entertainment-news/ ROXBURY – The Roxbury Arts Group will open its 2022 season with a performance by Stefanie Nelson Dancegroup scheduled for 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, May 21 at the Roxbury Arts Center at 5025 Vega Mountain Road in Roxbury. According to a press release, the piece to be performed by the contemporary ensemble is described as […]]]>

ROXBURY – The Roxbury Arts Group will open its 2022 season with a performance by Stefanie Nelson Dancegroup scheduled for 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, May 21 at the Roxbury Arts Center at 5025 Vega Mountain Road in Roxbury.

According to a press release, the piece to be performed by the contemporary ensemble is described as a powerful yet playful multidisciplinary exploration of memory loss.

The title chosen for the play, “A, My Name Is…”, refers to an alphabetic rhyming game for children designed to coordinate physical and verbal skills.

Choreographer Nelson uses a similar rhythmic progression as the main structural axis of the piece. Recalling how language is acquired and then retrogrades with aging, she translates her experience of dementia into complex layers. Increasingly organized sentences culminate and then dissolve into disorientation – a visual metaphor for memory loss. Nelson uses apple imagery to evoke the loss of beauty and innocence, the passage of time, the inexorability of gravity, and inevitable decay.

Nelson notes in the statement that she wondered how she could physically investigate the experience of being lost and added that she hopes “people will come away with a desire to ask more questions and confront what it means. live as the past fades away. ”

An audience discussion moderated by local community health advocate Diana Mason will follow the performance.

The New York-based Stefanie Nelson Dancegroup is a contemporary performance ensemble producing original works in close creative partnership with performers, visual artists and composers.

Driven by public service with a focus on education, the company’s work is clearly conceptual with a visceral and striking visual approach.

Since artistic director Stefanie Nelson founded the Dancegroup in 2000, it has established its presence in the United States and internationally, developing a repertoire of intensely collaborative multidisciplinary works. The New York Times describes Stefanie Nelson Dancegroup as “fierce and truthful with mad charm”.

Advance tickets are $21 for adults and $19 for seniors and students; youth 15 and under will be admitted free. Tickets at the door will be $26.

To visit roxburyartsgroup.orgemail programs@roxburyartsgroup.org or call 607-326-7908 for more information and tickets.

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The Polish National Song and Dance Ensemble will perform at the Reno campus of the University of Nevada https://sahnobar.com/the-polish-national-song-and-dance-ensemble-will-perform-at-the-reno-campus-of-the-university-of-nevada/ Thu, 19 May 2022 18:41:38 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/the-polish-national-song-and-dance-ensemble-will-perform-at-the-reno-campus-of-the-university-of-nevada/ The Polish National Song and Dance Ensemble, “Śląsk”, will perform on June 6 on the campus of the University of Nevada, Reno, in the Nightingale Concert Hall. The event serves as a welcome celebration for Polish officials visiting Reno on a trade and cultural mission. It also recognizes the country’s efforts to host more than […]]]>

The Polish National Song and Dance Ensemble, “Śląsk”, will perform on June 6 on the campus of the University of Nevada, Reno, in the Nightingale Concert Hall. The event serves as a welcome celebration for Polish officials visiting Reno on a trade and cultural mission. It also recognizes the country’s efforts to host more than 3 million Ukrainian refugees since the start of the Russian-Ukrainian war in February 2022.

Admission to the show is free and open to the public. Doors will open at 6:00 p.m. and the event will begin at 7:00 p.m. with a welcome from University President Brian Sandoval.

The invited representatives, including members of the “Śląsk” ensemble, come from the Polish province of Śląskie. The group, led by Provincial Marshal Jakub Chetstowski, travels to Nevada to sign a Memorandum of Understanding with the State of Nevada regarding business and commercial cooperation.

Members of the University and the greater Reno-Sparks community are encouraged to attend the show to show their solidarity with Poland and support for Ukrainian refugees. Interested persons can also help Ukrainian refugees by making a donation to the Polish Consulate Relief Fund.

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The Polish National Song and Dance Ensemble will perform at the Reno campus of the University of Nevada https://sahnobar.com/the-polish-national-song-and-dance-ensemble-will-perform-at-the-reno-campus-of-the-university-of-nevada-2/ Thu, 19 May 2022 18:41:38 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/the-polish-national-song-and-dance-ensemble-will-perform-at-the-reno-campus-of-the-university-of-nevada-2/ The Polish National Song and Dance Ensemble, “Śląsk”, will perform on June 6 on the campus of the University of Nevada, Reno, in the Nightingale Concert Hall. The event serves as a welcome celebration for Polish officials visiting Reno on a trade and cultural mission. It also recognizes the country’s efforts to host more than […]]]>

The Polish National Song and Dance Ensemble, “Śląsk”, will perform on June 6 on the campus of the University of Nevada, Reno, in the Nightingale Concert Hall. The event serves as a welcome celebration for Polish officials visiting Reno on a trade and cultural mission. It also recognizes the country’s efforts to host more than 3 million Ukrainian refugees since the start of the Russian-Ukrainian war in February 2022.

Admission to the show is free and open to the public. Doors will open at 6:00 p.m. and the event will begin at 7:00 p.m. with a welcome from University President Brian Sandoval.

The invited representatives, including members of the “Śląsk” ensemble, come from the Polish province of Śląskie. The group, led by Provincial Marshal Jakub Chetstowski, travels to Nevada to sign a Memorandum of Understanding with the State of Nevada regarding business and commercial cooperation.

Members of the University and the greater Reno-Sparks community are encouraged to attend the show to show their solidarity with Poland and support for Ukrainian refugees. Interested persons can also help Ukrainian refugees by making a donation to the Polish Consulate Relief Fund.

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Student showcase planned for this weekend – The Linfield Review https://sahnobar.com/student-showcase-planned-for-this-weekend-the-linfield-review/ Fri, 06 May 2022 04:04:04 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/student-showcase-planned-for-this-weekend-the-linfield-review/ At Linfield University, many talented groups go unnoticed. One such group is Linfield’s Dance Ensemble, led by choreographer and teacher Sarah Shouse. Housed in the music department, many Linfield students don’t even know there is a dance program at school. Dance classes belong to the MUSC category and Dance Ensemble is listed as MUSC*070. This […]]]>

At Linfield University, many talented groups go unnoticed. One such group is Linfield’s Dance Ensemble, led by choreographer and teacher Sarah Shouse.

Housed in the music department, many Linfield students don’t even know there is a dance program at school. Dance classes belong to the MUSC category and Dance Ensemble is listed as MUSC*070. This ensemble presents a common showcase at the end of the semester.

Anyone can audition for the showcase, even if they are not part of the class. Zee Nace, a Linfield sophomore, is one of the students right in the showcase. “I couldn’t take the class, but I was still welcome to come and audition for the showcase,” Nace said.

The Linfield Dance Ensemble Showcase will be held this year at ICE Auditorium on May 6-7 at 7 p.m. The show will feature nine dances from the ensemble and two from Linfield’s LatinX Adelante Club, LULA. Attendees can expect modern, jazz, tap, spoken word and folklorico performances.

Five of the dancers in the showcase are students from Linfield and the other five are students from Oregon State University. Shouse also teaches at OSU and decided to have a few collaboration pieces between Linfield and OSU students in the showcase.

A week before the show, the OSU and Linfield dancers were able to practice together for the first time this semester.

“I don’t know if it was necessarily difficult to merge the two groups because both were sufficiently prepared. The combination of the two groups gives an energy boost because each group finally sees the pieces coming together,” Shouse said.

Sarah Shouse (provided by Shouse)

Shouse allowed students to choreograph dances as part of the learning experience.

“The Linfield Ensemble was able to choose their own kind of dance and what they wanted to do musically,” she said. “We just started working through different choreographic devices and different ideas that they wanted to incorporate into the dance. They have the freedom to explore creatively.

For the students, the choreography was new, but exciting. Aimee Ritchy, a freshman at Linfield, had a great experience trying new things with her classmates. “I choreographed the tap dancing that we do. It went really well because these ladies learned to type really fast,” Ritchey said. “I’m very impressed with what people have done.

Ritchy, having some tap dancing experience, helped guide the other students, as the others had minimal tap dancing experience. But there was no judgment, as Ritchy pointed out. “We’re here to make dancing a non-toxic atmosphere,” she says.

Tap Ritchy (Annemarie Mullet)

Other dancers were also able to choreograph their favorite styles. Rookie Alice Cowie choreographed a dance. “I have a 60s jazz musical theater themed dance. It’s fun, it reminds me of my roots in musical theater as I used to compete in musical theater over the years to the dance,” Cowie explained.

Emma Bare, also a freshman at Linfield, took another route. “My dance is contemporary in style, which stems from my studio training. I got to choose the song and I choreographed my own dance,” Bare said.

The ensemble practicing the Bare dance. (Annemarie Mullet)

Cowie believes dance is for everyone. “You don’t have to be good, we just want people to have fun. Dance isn’t very well known as an art form or as a sport and just bringing the people to take a look is worth the dance,” Cowie said.

Continuing with a smile, Cowie pointed out that it’s not always an easy path, even if the dancers make it look easy. “Even as someone who has practiced, I still have a hard time remembering that I’m still a good dancer. Even if you mess up and fall, I literally fell flat on my stomach earlier, but that didn’t didn’t negate my dance skills, you get up and carry on,” Cowie said.

Freshman Savy Short, the newest member of the ensemble, has cheerleading on his list of dance skills. “I’ve learned that you’re going to make mistakes, you’re going to mess up, but knowing you can practice and improve is a push to improve, and knowing mistakes are okay helps encourage growth,” Short said of being newer. Dance.

The community created by the set also helps to encourage growth. “This course is literally a friendship, there is a connection in the air, it is a found friendship. I could be cliché and call it family,” Richty said.

Nace had a similar feeling. “Dancing gives you a sense of community. You can have your own individual dance journey, but having a group of people to dance with helps you feel confident in the individual dance you’re performing,” Nace said.

When asked what the dancers wanted the audience to take away from the show, Richty responded fervently and asked for the words to be capitalized in this story. “JOIN THE DANCE!” COME WATCH! ENJOY!” said Richty.

Join the Linfield Dance Ensemble on Friday, May 6 and Saturday, May 7 at ICE Auditorium at 7 p.m. for their showcase. Tickets are free for K-12 and Linfield students with ID, and $10 for everyone else. Proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test is required for entry.

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Fredonia Dance Ensemble returns to live performance with an annual concert | News, Sports, Jobs https://sahnobar.com/fredonia-dance-ensemble-returns-to-live-performance-with-an-annual-concert-news-sports-jobs/ Thu, 05 May 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/fredonia-dance-ensemble-returns-to-live-performance-with-an-annual-concert-news-sports-jobs/ Photo submitted The Fredonia Dance Ensemble will perform Friday, May 6 at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, May 7 at 2 and 7:30 p.m. at the Marvel Theater at the State University of New York in Fredonia. The event is part of the Walter Gloor Mainstage Series presented by the Department of Theater […]]]>

Photo submitted The Fredonia Dance Ensemble will perform Friday, May 6 at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, May 7 at 2 and 7:30 p.m. at the Marvel Theater at the State University of New York in Fredonia. The event is part of the Walter Gloor Mainstage Series presented by the Department of Theater and Dance.

On Friday and Saturday, the Fredonia Dance Ensemble returns to the stage at the State University of New York’s Marvel Theater in Fredonia for its first in-person concert since 2019.

Performances will take place at 7:30 p.m. on Friday and at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. on Saturday. Twenty-six BFA Dance majors will perform. The FDE concert is presented by the Department of Theater and Dance as part of the Walter Gloor Mainstage 2021-22 series.

Tickets are available at the Fredonia Campus Box Office at the Williams Center, by phone at 716-673-3501, and online at fredonia.edu/tickets.

Fredonia Dance Ensemble Director Paula J. Peters explained what it means to be able to return to live, in-person presentation after a two-year hiatus.

“The hardest thing about the pandemic for dancers and choreographers has been the loss of being able to move our bodies together in real time in the same space and sharing that energy with the audience,” Peters said. “I think a lot of us never realized how transformative live dance performances were until we couldn’t do it anymore.”

The director describes his return to the stage “like a return to full life. Working with students on choreography, seeing them stretch themselves physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually, was an incredibly joyful experience. We are so grateful to be back in the theater, and grateful for everyone in the studio and behind the scenes, who worked hard to make this performance possible.

In addition to works choreographed by Fredonia Dance faculty members, dance majors will perform pieces created by guest artists Carlos Jones, Irvin Gonzalez and Alfonso Cervera. Visiting Artist Residencies have been made possible through the support of the Williams Visiting Professor Endowment through the Fredonia College Foundation.

“We were also fortunate to have Carlos Jones, Irvin Gonzalez and Alfonso Cervera on campus for a week-long teaching and choreographic residency to create work on Fredonia Dance Ensemble,” Peters said. “In addition, Irvin and Alfonso will return to campus and perform a duet they created during their residency.”?

Ultimately, Peters hopes the Fredonia Dance Ensemble performance will also be transformative for audience members.

“I hope people connect with something? In the concert that resonates with them as humans, sitting down with ideas that might inspire them to think differently and have a transformative moment for themselves” , said the director.



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Inside Out Dance Ensemble returns to the Meyer Theater – McCcagora https://sahnobar.com/inside-out-dance-ensemble-returns-to-the-meyer-theater-mcccagora/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/inside-out-dance-ensemble-returns-to-the-meyer-theater-mcccagora/ Director Kellie Lajiness watches the IODE rehearsal from afar. (Photo by Emma Marion) IODE members (left to right) Elisabeth Brockman, Ashley Redfern and Claire Bacarella perform “Grant Us Peace” during the IODE rehearsal. Kevin Daniels plays his guitar and sings his original song during IODE rehearsal. (Photo by Emma Marion) IODE members (left to right) […]]]>

Director Kellie Lajiness watches the IODE rehearsal from afar. (Photo by Emma Marion)

IODE members (left to right) Elisabeth Brockman, Ashley Redfern and Claire Bacarella perform “Grant Us Peace” during the IODE rehearsal.

Kevin Daniels plays his guitar and sings his original song during IODE rehearsal. (Photo by Emma Marion)

IODE members (left to right) Autumn Hensley, Claire Bacarella, Ashley Redfern and Elisabeth Brockman perform “Framework” during the IODE rehearsal. (Photo by Emma Marion)

Elisabeth Brockman performs “Grant Us Peace” at the IODE rehearsal. (Photo by Emma Marion)

Autumn Hensley performs “Masks Optional” at IODE rehearsal. (Photo by Emma Marion)

Autumn Hensley and Kelli Plumb perform a tap duet at IODE rehearsal. (Photo by Emma Marion)

Ashley Redfern performs a solo at IODE rehearsal. (Photo by Emma Marion)

Inside Out Dance Ensemble was set to hold its 10th anniversary celebration as an ensemble in 2020, but the pandemic had other plans. IODE Director Kellie Lajiness said she was delighted to be back on stage for their first annual concert since 2019. The Inside Out Dance Ensemble performed this The concert of the year is entitled “Access” on April 9 and 10 at the Meyer Theatre.“We kept saying to ourselves ‘if only we had access to the studio’ and ‘if only we had access to the stage,'” Lajiness said. “It seemed appropriate to use it for the title of our concert.”

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State Dance Ensemble will perform at the Mugham Center [PHOTO] https://sahnobar.com/state-dance-ensemble-will-perform-at-the-mugham-center-photo/ Fri, 15 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://sahnobar.com/state-dance-ensemble-will-perform-at-the-mugham-center-photo/ By Laman Ismayilova International Mugham Center invites you to enjoy a wonderful concert on April 16. Famous singers and musicians, including soloists of the State Dance Ensemble, will take part in the concert program entitled “Karabakh is Azerbaijan”. Founded in 1938 by the eminent composer Uzeyir Hajibeyli, the National Song and Dance Ensemble successfully promotes […]]]>

By Laman Ismayilova

International Mugham Center invites you to enjoy a wonderful concert on April 16.

Famous singers and musicians, including soloists of the State Dance Ensemble, will take part in the concert program entitled “Karabakh is Azerbaijan”.

Founded in 1938 by the eminent composer Uzeyir Hajibeyli, the National Song and Dance Ensemble successfully promotes the country’s dance art.

Since 1984, the ensemble bears the name of the Azerbaijani composer Fikrat Amirov. The ensemble’s repertoire consists of traditional songs, dances as well as pieces of music by world-renowned composers.

Since 2000, the National Folk Instrument Orchestra of Azerbaijan has been operating under the ensemble.

In 2020, the National Song and Dance Ensemble of Azerbaijan successfully performed at the 10th Gorchi International Folklore and National Culture Festival in Dagestan.

The ensemble thrilled the audience with “Jangi” by Uzeyir Hajibeyli, “Azerbaijan” by Rauf Hajiyev, as well as dances “Gavalla dance” and “Yalli”.

The National Song and Dance Ensemble received a special diploma for the protection of ethnocultural heritage of Azerbaijan and international cooperation in this field.

Famous for its spectacular concerts, the International Mugham Center is constantly developing its activities, organizing many international projects, concert programs, seminars and conferences aimed at promoting mugham art.

The Mugham Center has agreed cooperation with the Uzbek National Center in Makom, the Polish Baltic Philharmonic Orchestra, the Polish Baltic Philharmonic Orchestra, the Russian National Museum, the Yunus Emre Institute, etc.

The Center has also signed a cultural cooperation protocol with Hungary.

The memorandum will contribute to the expansion of cultural ties between the countries and the promotion of Mugham art and Azerbaijani music.

The Mugham Center has successfully implemented multiple cultural projects aimed at promoting national music: “Evenings of Ashug Music”, “Treasure of Secrets”, “Unforgettable”, “Pearls of Ethnic Music”, etc.

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Laman Ismayilova is the journalist of AzerNews, follow her on Twitter: @Lamiva993

Laman Ismayilova is the journalist of AzerNews, follow her on Twitter: @Lamiva993

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