close

Dance ensemble

Dance ensemble

State Dance Ensemble dazzles at festival in Jordan

(MENAFN- AzerNews) By Laman Ismayilova

The State Dance Ensemble performed successfully at the 35th Jerash Festival for Culture and the Arts in Jordan.

The Jerash Festival for Culture and the Arts is an annual event held in Jerash, Jordan. It is part of the Jordan Festival, which aims to enrich cultural activities in Jordan.

Founded in 1981 by Queen Noor, it presents several shows performed by Jordanian, Arab and foreign artists.

The ensemble performed a suite “My Azerbaijan”, dance compositions “Naz Elama”, “Ag Chichak”, “Qaytagi”, “Sari Galin” and “Karabakh Yalli”.

Jordanian media described the ensemble’s performance as one of the festival’s finest.

Since 1970 the Azerbaijan Dance Ensemble has been promoting the art of Azerbaijani dance, the beauty and elegance of national dances.

The ensemble constantly participates in Azerbaijani state events, successfully tours Russia, CIS countries, USA, Italy, France, Portugal, Spain, Norway, in Switzerland, Belgium, Israel, India, Nepal, South Korea, China, Vietnam, Iraq, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Mexico, Brazil, Cuba and many more countries .

The team traditionally represents their country’s culture at international festivals in Russia, Ukraine, Georgia, Turkey, Austria, Germany, Egypt, Qatar, China, Japan, Tunisia and other countries. other countries.

In 1991, the State Dance Ensemble was awarded the title of Honored Azerbaijani Collective for its outstanding contribution to the development of national culture. The artistic director of the ensble is the people’s artist Rufat Khalilzadeh.

Follow us on Twitter @AzerNewsAz

  • #AZERBADJAN STATE DANCE GROUP
  • #DANCE
  • #ART
  • #CULTURE
  • #JORDAN
  • #AZERBAIJAN

MENAFN01102021000195011045ID1102899154

Legal warning: MENAFN provides the information “as is” without warranty of any kind. We accept no responsibility for the accuracy, content, images, videos, licenses, completeness, legality or reliability of the information contained in this article. If you have any complaints or copyright issues related to this item, please contact the supplier above.


Source link

read more
Dance ensemble

State Dance Ensemble dazzles at festival in Jordan [PHOTO]

October 1, 2021 3:17 p.m. (UTC + 04:00)

327

By Laman Ismayilova

The State Dance Ensemble performed successfully at the 35th Jerash Festival for Culture and the Arts in Jordan.

The Jerash Festival for Culture and the Arts is an annual event held in Jerash, Jordan. It is part of the Jordan Festival, which aims to enrich cultural activities in Jordan.

Founded in 1981 by Queen Noor, it presents several shows performed by Jordanian, Arab and foreign artists.

The ensemble performed a suite “My Azerbaijan”, dance compositions “Naz Elama”, “Ag Chichak”, “Qaytagi”, “Sari Galin” and “Karabakh Yalli”.

Jordanian media described the ensemble’s performance as one of the festival’s finest.

Since 1970 the Azerbaijan Dance Ensemble has been promoting the art of Azerbaijani dance, the beauty and elegance of national dances.

The ensemble constantly participates in Azerbaijani state events, successfully tours Russia, CIS countries, USA, Italy, France, Portugal, Spain, Norway, in Switzerland, Belgium, Israel, India, Nepal, South Korea, China, Vietnam, Iraq, Tunisia, Algeria, Morocco, Saudi Arabia, Mexico, Brazil, Cuba and many more countries .

The team traditionally represents their country’s culture at international festivals in Russia, Ukraine, Georgia, Turkey, Austria, Germany, Egypt, Qatar, China, Japan, Tunisia and other countries. other countries.

In 1991, the State Dance Ensemble was awarded the title of Honored Azerbaijani Collective for its outstanding contribution to the development of national culture. The artistic director of the ensble is the people’s artist Rufat Khalilzadeh.

Follow us on twitter @AzerNewsAz



Source link

read more
Dance ensemble

Michele Brangwen Dance Ensemble’s “Asa Nisi Masa” Preview Tonight

“Asa Nisi Masa” is a new dance and music film from the Michele Brangwen Dance Ensemble which takes its title from the childhood incantation spoken in Federico Fellini’s film “8 1/2”. The phrase Asa Nisi Masa evokes a beautiful memory for the main character of the film of an era filled with compassion and love.

“Asa Nisi Masa”, with choreography, montage and costumes by Michele Brangwen and music composed by Danielle Reich, Thomas Helton and Tim Hagans, also features movement and music spontaneously created in the moment by all performers. dancers Robin Gilbert, Cristian Laverde König and Michele Brangwen; saxophonists Robin Verheyen and Jon Irabagon; trumpeter Tim Hagans; bassist Thomas Helton and singer Danielle Reich interact live on a rooftop in New York City.

The idea behind the film was to create a sort of dance and music mantra and send it out into the world. “Asa Nisi Masa” is the first time that Michele Brangwen Dance Ensemble has worked in person as a fully vaccinated ensemble. For previous projects during the pandemic, they had rehearsed only through Zoom and filmed each artist separately for safety reasons.

The final section of the film is Brangwen’s secular take on the idea of ​​the Tibetan prayer flag. Brangwen writes: “The idea behind the prayer flag is not that the person hanging it asks the wind to carry a request for something, but rather seeks to send kindness into all spaces. I think we are now in a time where we need to send as much kindness and healing energy as possible into our fractured world. Part of the costume that each performer wears becomes a flag at the end. I wanted to try to make the flag very personal. “

Brangwen explains, “Nothing in the middle section of the improvisations in the film was planned or traced, and we only did one take, so gusts of wind sometimes hit the mics, the helicopters buzz and the performers come out. sometimes out of the setting, but for me It only added to the immediacy and honesty of the moment. What emerged were those incredible moments like dancer Cristian Laverde König, with trumpeter Tim Hagans and saxophonist Robin Verheyen, seeming to take every note of the effusive call of the musicians in his body and in the end, exchanging riffs with them as if his body were a third horn. Dancer Robin Gilbert and the same two musicians tell a mysterious story that seems full of pathos and nostalgia, culminating when Ms. Gilbert pulls the two musicians into her in an enveloping embrace. For me, it’s magic. “

Some people believe that Fellini was sending a hidden message in the phrase Asa Nisi Masa, using an Italian form of porcine Latin that adds an “sa” and an “if” to words in order to disguise them. If you take the roots of each word in the expression Asa Nisi Masa, the letters form the word Anima, which is the Italian word for soul. Brangwen writes: “This act of creating dance and music together is part of our soul, so what better thing could we send in the world. This is what we have to offer and we send it with love. . “

Live broadcasts of “Asa Nisi Masa” will include a real-time introduction by choreographer and filmmaker Michele Brangwen and composer and trumpeter Tim Hagans, and a post-premiere section where performers respond in front of the camera to comments and questions from the audience. tonight September 19 via Facebook. The film will be shown again, followed by a question-and-answer session on YouTube on September 26. The events are free.

The Michele Brangwen Dance Ensemble is a contemporary dance company featuring all new choreography, original live music and the integration of all of our musicians into visual imagery, so dancers and musicians break the boundaries of the traditional interaction of sets. In 20 years, each performance has included live music and musicians as an integral part of the visual imagery of the stage. We believe that the role of the artist in society is to communicate, to challenge, to open a dialogue that can both unite us and inspire significant change. We operate as a jazz band and, with sections of choreographed movements and written music, we use the improvisation that flows from the form, concept and emotional life of the work. The Michele Brangwen Dance Ensemble is based in New York and Houston. www.brangwendance.org


Source link

read more
Dance ensemble

The new Ballare Carmel dance ensemble brings professional dancers from around the world to Carmel Valley. | Art, theater and culture

When Lillian Barbeito saw the Hidden Valley Institute of the Arts stage, she heard angels singing. But when the director of the institute, Peter Meckel, showed her the dormitories where the dancers could sleep, Barbeito realized that she had found the place to cultivate the art of dance practiced locally and consumed locally. .

“Never do people come together so much as through dancing,” says Barbeito, seated barefoot outside the building where rehearsals for her new dance company Ballare Carmel have already started, attracting dancers aged 17 to 37. of the whole world. Their shoes are lined up at the entrance; the whole valley listens to Pergolesi Stabat Mater chosen for practice. The dancers do not hesitate to dance with a mask and the organizers do not hesitate to clean the space three times a day. “It’s amazing that people can touch again,” says Barbeito.

Formerly the co-artistic director of Los Angeles-based contemporary dance company BODYTRAFFIC, Barbeito moved to Carmel in August 2021. Since then, she launched the Carmel Dance Festival – the first show was in late July – and will now present Ballare.

Ballare Carmel is a local dance company that will work with dancers from as far away as Canada and Taiwan. Its mission is to bring professional dance to the highest level in the region and present it to the local community. Barbeito wants to involve local dancers, she says, but focuses on local performance. The verb “ballare” means “to dance” in Latin.

Currently, with choreographer Ishan Rustem, born in London and based in Switzerland, the resident choreographer of the NW Dance Project in Portland who has come to train with the 20 dancers selected for this iteration (not all of them will perform), Barbeito is creating a show. for the community on Saturday September 18th.

“He’s everything I ever dreamed of,” Barbeito says of Rustem, adding that she wanted to work with him because of his kindness as an instructor and his ability to empower young dancers from diverse backgrounds. .

“To me, it’s a very simple formula,” says Rustem, giving the dancers a five-minute break (the music going from haunting James Blake to happy Erykah Badu). “Before I was a teacher I was a student and I can remember what worked for me.”

Rustem plans to teach the younger generation about their artistic responsibility. He also believes that trust, vulnerability and openness to information are important when imparting knowledge. “It’s no fun when your teacher is a diva and that’s not the way to get the best out of people,” he says.

BALLARE CARMEL LAUNCH PARTY includes a silent auction at 6:30 p.m. and a preview at 7:30 p.m. on Saturday, September 18. Hidden Valley Theater, 104 W. Carmel Valley Road, Carmel Valley. $ 25. 659-3115, hiddenvalleymusic.org


Source link

read more
Dance ensemble

After 25 years, the Sacred Dance Ensemble of Fredericksburg takes its bow | Local News

Support local journalism

Your subscription makes our report possible.

{{featured_button_text}}

With those words and inspiration in mind, Wilder approached her then pastor and asked if she could dance at an upcoming service.

On Pentecost Sunday in 1996, Wilder performed a solo dance in the sanctuary using white cloth to symbolize the Holy Spirit descending to the disciples after Jesus’ ascension.

Subsequently, she invited other local dancers to a workshop, and a core of women began to come together each week as the Sacred Dance Ensemble of Fredericksburg.

“I told them I heard the call, but I didn’t get a roadmap,” Wilder said. “I had no idea where it was going, but I asked them to trust the process and come with me, and we did.”

For longtime members, the group has been a way both to keep dancing a part of their lives and to use their love of dancing to express their faith.

“I’m never whole unless I do something with dance,” Greenlaw said. “We feel called to do it and I think it is a ministry.”

In addition to those with extensive dance training, the group has members who “haven’t taken dance lessons in their lives,” Wilder said.

“It has always been interfaith,” she said. “It doesn’t matter what church you go to or what faith you are. We’ve had people come forward and say, “I don’t know why I’m here. I don’t dance, but I feel called to explore this. And we just invite them to explore. There’s never been the wait for you to dance in worship, you can just come dance with us.


Source link

read more
Dance ensemble

The Schaumburg Dance Ensemble will organize auditions for “The Nutcracker”

The Schaumburg Dance Ensemble announces open auditions for its 26th annual production of The Nutcracker.

Roles for children and adults are available, as well as roles for professional dancers. The production is directed and choreographed by Lisa Sheppard. Alberto Arias is co-director and choreographer; Amy Rose is a ballet mistress.

The program returns after a one-year hiatus due to COVID-19. Sheppard, who has been with the ensemble for 10 years as assistant program director, succeeds ensemble founding director Michele Holzman, who retired earlier this year.

“Alberto, Lisa and I were a fantastic team. We exchanged ideas and supported each other in our artistic visions, ”says Holzman. “I am sure Lisa will guide the production to many years of success.”

Auditions will take place in two locations, with a third location reserved for professional dancers.

General Hearings

Al Larson Prairie Center for the Arts, 201 Schaumburg Court, Schaumburg:

Saturday August 21

• 9 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. 8-10 years old. At least one year of classical ballet training.

• 11:15 am-11:45 am Parents meeting for all parents of auditioning students.

• 11:45 am to 2 pm 11-13 years old. At least two years of classical ballet training.

• 2 pm-2.45pm Boys 7-13. No dance training required.

Saturday August 28

• 10 am-10.30am Parents meeting for parents of all students auditioning.

• 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 13 years-old adult. Advanced intermediate. Bring advanced, character, jazz and ballet slippers.

Sunday August 29

• 8 am-5pm Reminders by invitation.

Auditions at the Dance Academy of Libertyville, 746 E Park Ave., Libertyville:

Friday August 20

• 5 pm-6.30pm 8-10 years old. At least one year of classical ballet training.

• 6:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. Parents’ meeting for all parents of auditioning students.

• 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 11-13 years old. At least two years of classical ballet training.

• 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. 13 years-old adult.

Sunday August 29

• 8 am to 5 pm Invitation-only reminders at the Al Larson Prairie Center for the Arts in Schaumburg.

Dancers are requested to register online at least 24 hours before the auditions at www.schaumburgdance.com.

Dancers must arrive at least 20 minutes before auditions and are asked to bring a photo. A parent or guardian must attend a meeting at the start of the hearing. The participation fee for cast members (for those selected) is $ 175 for performers in a single role and $ 225 for performers in multiple roles.

Auditions for salaried roles will be held by appointment at the Al Larson Prairie Center for the Arts from 1 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, August 25. Professional dancers are asked to call (224) 246-5776 to schedule an audition.

More information is available at www.schaumburgdance.com or by calling (224) 246-5776.

The Schaumburg Dance Ensemble is a program of the village of Schaumburg.


Source link

read more
Dance ensemble

Set of classical dance and dance yoga performance

Suresh Bodiwala

CHICAGO: On the evening of June 19, 2021, Guru Asha Adiga Acharya conducted “Nupura Geetha” the dance ensemble team performed a memorization dance performance near the lake area within Blackberry Farm in Aurora, a Chicago suburb

The event was hosted by Nupura Geetha Inc, a nonprofit arts and culture organization in Illinois, United States. Due to the pandemic, he was taken outside in the midst of nature.

The program started with all participants chanting â ???? Omâ ???? and the students of the Acharya Performing Arts Academy performed the “Nrithya Yogasana” ???? that is to ???? Dance Yogaâ ???? invented by artistic director guru Asha Adiga Acharya by combining yoga and Indian classical dance movements, for the benefit of Pada (Feet), Anga (Body) and Mudra (Fingers).

Then the team of the dance ensemble “Nupura Geetha” started the performance with the beautiful Ganesha dance, the pure Alaripu dance, the Mallari dance, the expression filled dance based on Vachana, the Anathapurageethe dance and finished the program with Charishnu dance which has been creatively choreographed with yoga poses.

This program was funded in part by a grant from the Illinois Arts Council. Kristi Blocton and Madhavilatha Gali were the main performers of the dance ensemble’s team.

The comparison of the program was carried out by Srinivasa Acharya. The other performers in the ensemble were Jessica Abraham, Jyothi Papudesu, Ananya Saraswati, DinaraGodage, Shreya Mukunthan, AnanayaNagareshwra, Harshitha Vetrivel, SrijaniPrekki, Adithi Acharya, AkshataGajula, ShreeyaYamphaniSriamani and. Almost 100 guests attended this beautiful outdoor event.

comments

comments


Source link

read more
Dance ensemble

JUST IN: Ezimnyama Dance Ensemble is working on a new piece, Hope

The Chronicle

Mthabisi Tshuma, Showbiz Correspondent

EZIMNYAMA Dance Ensemble has written a contemporary dance production called Hope, which is expected to launch on their various social media platforms next month.

The production seeks to give hope to the masses that the pandemic will pass or subside, and that the public will return to their past way of life.

The director of the dance group Phibion ​​Ncube said: “The production comes after the coronavirus devastated the whole world as it brought terrible suffering to humanity where many people lost their lives, their jobs and this forced people to adjust to the new and unpredictable normal.

“As a whole, we have created this type of room to uplift the spirit of humanity and give people hope that the pandemic will end and our lives will return to normal. It may take a long time but it will pass eventually and so we all need to have hope with the deployment and distribution of vaccines because we are now certain that if we work together the coronavirus will be defeated. “

Ncube said what makes this piece exceptional is that they decided to let the dance tell itself.

“The story is told through dance. Most people are used to playing and talking, but this time the dance is telling. It is a contemporary dance piece, an expressive style of dance that combines elements from several dance genres, including modern, jazz, lyrical and classical ballet.

“We discovered that dancing is limitless. So we adopted this unique dance style and it’s amazing and refreshing, ”said Ncube.

[email protected]_mthire


Source link

read more
Dance ensemble

Sunduza Dance Ensemble takes a step back in time with Injabulo

The Chronicle

Mthabisi Tshuma, Showbiz Correspondent
ARTS group Sunduza Dance Theater will take to the stage at Bulawayo Theater on Thursday where they will present Injabulo, a play that is very dear to them as it was their first stage production that led to their breakthrough 35 years ago.

The renowned group will take people back in time with the production which will be staged thanks to the sponsorship of Matopos Music from the UK.

The show is scheduled to start at 2:30 p.m.

Group director Charles Banda said they would perform the piece in memory of the deceased members of the group who played a pivotal role in transforming the group to what it is today.

“Thirty-five years after the group was formed, we will see a revival of the group’s first full production, Injabulo. “

It was a song that marked the band’s launch as the High Stars Sunduza Boys in 1985. It also took the band to the UK in 1992 on their first tour.

“Injabulo follows the story of a young man who grows up in his rural area and settles in South Africa to find work in the mines although he dreams of becoming a musician,” said Banda.

He added that the glory of Sunduza Dance Ensemble’s debut work will be celebrated with new footage using modern technology from Veins Media.

“The original central star of the series had Simon Banda who was heavily supported by Elijah Mbambo, Misheck Moyo and the late Alec Ncube who ended his career playing with Black Umfolosi.

Sunduza Dance Theater Members

“Baphi Mdladla and Khalipani Ndlovu continue to be happy to have been with the band since the first tour in 1992.

“The young man from Injabulo is now played by promising actor Ntando Sithole with his superb tenor voice.

“He will be supported by Mkhululi Khanye as the mine captain and chief choreographer, as well as a nice cast that will delight audiences,” Banda said.

He said the timeless production which includes many traditional and modern dances is always a hit with theater audiences, especially children.

During the lockdown, Banda said they were able to tap into the virtual space. Reflecting on the arts group’s past years, Banda said, “Injabulo, as the group is now known, had a strong anti-apartheid sentiment.

“Over time, the group has evolved over time and changed in character to become a youth-friendly family business.

“The band, after their first UK tour in a year, started to include women. It has gone from purely a cappella concerts to a full musical dance theater. Unfortunately there was a long hiatus in full touring after 2002 as a huge school program was being developed in Yorkshire (UK), ”said Banda.

“The weeklong workshops led by the late Simon Banda and the late Mandla Sibanda simply created unstoppable careers by linking the arts to the UK curriculum in many imaginative ways.”

Banda led the group in reviving his father’s old songs and introducing an exciting new repertoire. Wonderful songs such as Imali, Nompilo, Sinikiwe, Istimela that wowed people from London to Singapore and all the way to Vancouver will finally be heard again in the city, Banda said.

The group has also relaunched several productions in recent years to reach an international level of competence. These include Voices from the Rocks – the story of the Matopos and the adventures of Robert Moffat. [email protected]_mthire


Source link

read more
Dance ensemble

The California College Dance Ensemble (Pa.) Takes more than the stage to help the HOPE Center in Tarentum

Dance is more than choreographed steps on a stage.

It’s a performance created to encourage people to take action.

The Dance Ensemble at the University of California, Pennsylvania in Washington County creates dances that focus on the art of movement and advocacy for topics such as autism awareness, suicide prevention, and health. mental.

Their most recent dance highlights domestic violence.

“You can use your time on stage to just dance, or you can use that time to make the world a better place,” said Diane Eperthener-Buffington of Coraopolis, who has been teaching dance at the university for 12 years in the Department of Cultural Media. and performance. She also taught psychology for eight years. “We dive into the subjects. These dancers are selfless. They want to make a difference.

Courtesy of Diane Eperthener-Buffington

Diane Eperthener-Buffington, of Coraopolis, has been teaching dance at the university for 12 years in the Department of Cultural Media and Performance.

Its philosophy is “Dance with a goal”.

The movements are considered modern and contemporary. The facial expressions of the dancers help tell a story. There are spoken parts as well as written words indicating where people can go for help.

The 24-minute dance aired on Wednesday at a college event called Strike a Spark Research Conference.

It is available on YouTube.

It’s National Victims of Crime Rights Week.

Eperthener-Buffington has reached out to help the Alle-Kiski area HOPE center in Tarentum, which serves victims of violence and abuse in the northern counties of Allegheny and Westmoreland, as well as the center and Greater Pittsburgh Women’s Shelter, domesticshelters.org and Southwestern Pennsylvania Domestic Violence Services.

“I love the social change segment that they incorporated into the art of the dance ensemble,” said Michelle Gibb, executive director of the HOPE Center.

In the video, each dancer is in a physically different space. They have been separated because of the pandemic. The dance ended virtually.

“To see them in different spaces, and the fact that they’re all isolated, until they’re all displayed on the split screen, is very powerful,” Gibb said. “Often the victims are isolated in their own homes, a place where most of us feel safe. “

Gibb noted the juxtaposition of backgrounds from an empty garage or basement to a furnished living room and in front of a beautiful arched window. This shows that domestic violence can affect people from all walks of life.

“For social change to work, society has to change,” Gibb said. “This group of young people has a better understanding of the root causes and foundations of domestic violence. If you aren’t aware of a problem, you can’t stop it from happening.

Gibbs said having the performances available on YouTube extends its reach.

The dancers are from first year to seniors. They are volunteers and devote six or more hours per week.

“I love that we are standing up for something that is such a big issue,” said Rachel Wells, a psychology student at Brentwood. “We need to talk about these issues. “

Wells, who started dancing at the age of 2, said Eperthener-Buffington made learning easier by breaking down steps.

“It was an experience that I will remember all my life,” Wells said. “As students, we are under the stress of exams and everyday college life. Being able to work with Diane on this dance really helped us all in our 40s. I don’t know what I would have done without it.

This question is even more important now because of the last year of quarantine, Wells said.

“What Diane does has always been relevant, but it is even more relevant today,” Wells said. “Society needs to talk about these issues. If our dance only helps one person, it will all be worth it.

Wells said there was definitely a learning curve in the beginning with virtual instruction.

Eperthener-Buffington credits the undergraduate research center with former research director Gregg Gould, who is an associate professor of mathematics and physical sciences, for providing a home for the dance ensemble. Dean of Librarianship Douglas Hoover, Secretary of Librarianship Barbara Engle and Associate Professor of Social Work Azadeh Block also played roles in the project.

She also said that Michael Slavin, who is retired and who was the former chair of the university’s drama and dance department, believed in the project. Eperthener-Buffington was inspired to begin these dances because of her son, Colton.

At 18 months, he was diagnosed with autism. She wanted to give a voice to children who are on the autism spectrum.

“We talk pretty deeply about topics like suicide awareness and the resources available on campus,” Eperthener-Buffington said. “We are talking about addiction. And the deeper we go, the more emotional we can become. But we also talk about the light at the end of the tunnel. Depression, drug addiction and domestic violence are all on the rise, and more children are witnessing domestic violence at home. “

JoAnne Klimovich Harrop is the editor of Tribune-Review. You can contact JoAnne at 724-853-5062, [email protected] or via Twitter .



Source link

read more
1 2
Page 1 of 2