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February 2020

Dance ensemble

Dance ensemble brings African traditions to Boone – The Appalachian

Created not only for App State students, but for the entire Boone community, the Diyé African Dance and Drum Ensemble aims to bring people together through the arts.

“I believe in African music and dance, culture and dance. It’s a functional marriage, ”said Baba Khalid Saleem, internationally renowned specialist in African music.

According to the African Union, the definition of the African diaspora is “People of African origin living outside the continent, whatever their citizenship and nationality, and who are willing to contribute to the development of the continent and to the construction of the African Union”.

“There are African dance companies all over the world. It’s amazing how many colleges have included this in their curriculum, ”said Sherone Price, Associate Professor of Dance Studies.

With hundreds of African languages, Saleem said he starts off by giving beginners a phrase such as “pay attention, we’ll start right away”, then adds a rhythm, and he found that it helps students get along with it. remember the music.

Saleem said that many African drums and dances come from ancient rituals and traditions passed down from generation to generation.

Price said that sometimes African dance comes with a stigma that if someone is not born into the culture, they are not allowed to participate.

There are African dance companies all over the world. It’s amazing how many colleges have included this in their curriculum.

– Sherone Prize

“What is it? Just because we believe in something, or love something, why can’t we do that too, if we find ourselves devoted or respectful to it?” Award said.

Price and Saleem said the set is an opportunity for anyone to hang out, regardless of their background, and for students to interact with those around the university.

“As an App State professor, I think sometimes we ignore the community,” Price said.

Price and Kaleem said they wanted to make sure people understand that while “we are part of the university, we are also part of a larger group of people.”

“It’s not about taking, taking, taking, but also about giving, giving, giving,” Price said.

Price said that when working for the Fall or Spring Appalachian Dance Ensemble, he always includes a piece related to African diaspora dance or contemporary African work, as he feels it is important to present, and that is what he hopes to do with Diyé.

“Sharing is something about African dance culture,” Price said.


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Dance group

Korean dance group performs neck-deep in water tanks by the water’s edge

A Korean dance group will climb into human-sized reservoirs filled with water tonight and encourage their audience on Wellington’s waterfront to join them.

Elephants Laugh will perform neck-deep in the water, exploring themes of inclusion, diversity, and what it means to be an island nation, as part of the free event The Performance Arcade.

Dancer Yared Kebede, 26, said they have been rehearsing Muljil since last Sunday.

“It’s really exciting to be honest – it’s something you wouldn’t expect.”

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For three nights this week on Wellington's waterfront, a Korean performing group and members of the refugee community will climb into water-filled tanks, encouraging their audiences to do the same.

MONIQUE FORD / STUFF

For three nights this week on Wellington’s waterfront, a Korean performing group and members of the refugee community will climb into water-filled tanks, encouraging their audiences to do the same.

Slipping into the water first – even though it was hot – was always a shock, he said, and he hoped audiences would enjoy the show for its uniqueness.

Director Jinyeob Lee met up with performance arcade art director Sam Trubridge in Korea, who thought it would be a good message for New Zealanders after the Christchurch mosque attacks.

“[Audiences] can’t imagine being refugees, they don’t click, ”Lee said.

Four performers each start in a tank and are joined towards the end by another performer.

Dancers perform neck-deep in the water, exploring themes of inclusion, diversity, and what it means to be an island nation, as part of the free Performance Arcade event.

MONIQUE FORD / STUFF

Dancers perform neck-deep in the water, exploring themes of inclusion, diversity, and what it means to be an island nation, as part of the free Performance Arcade event.

Soon this artist would leave and invite members of the public to climb the tanks themselves.

“We want to trigger relationships with this community, with the local population. We often do participatory performances,” she said.

“I want to have a different relationship. Instead of actor to person, person to person.”

People often thought it was installed, but real strangers stepped forward to climb it.

The group has performed around the world and rehearsing with local members of the refugee community in Wellington since last Sunday.

MONIQUE FORD / STUFF

The group has performed around the world and rehearsing with local members of the refugee community in Wellington since last Sunday.

The Wellingtonians would they be ready to go? “So far, we have never failed,” said Lee.

Performance Arcade is a free annual event that takes place on Wellington’s waterfront until March 1.

Running annually since 2011, an assortment of shipping containers creates an innovative new space for the presentation of the performing arts.

The audience grew to over 90,000 people in 2019.

"We want to trigger relations with this community, with the local population.  We often do participatory performances," said director Jinyeob Lee.

MONIQUE FORD / STUFF

“We want to spark relationships with this community, with the local people. We often do participatory performances,” said director Jinyeob Lee.

* Catch the show at the Performance Arcade behind Te Papa until Sunday 1 at 8:45 p.m. every evening.


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Dance ensemble

Geneseo Dance Ensemble ‘Dancing on the Edge’ – News – The Evening Tribune

GENESEO – SUNY Geneseo’s Drama and Dance Studies Department presents the Geneseo dance ensemble in “Dancing on the Edge” with new works from teachers and guest artists.

The concert, artistically directed and produced by dance studies teacher Jonette Lancos with associate professor Dr Mark Broomfield, will be presented at the Alice Austin Theater February 27-29 at 7:30 p.m. and March 1 at 2 p.m. are $ 10 and available at the student association box office or at http://bbo.geneseo.edu.

Guy Thorne, guest artist during the fall semester 2019, will create They Slice the Air and Reinvent Themselves to lyrics by Charles Bukowski with music by Wganda Kenya. Based on the traditional Jamaican movement incorporating the technique of Garth Fagan, the dancers use machetes to symbolize the sugar cane cutters, while continuously redefining themselves.

Jon Lehrer, guest artist in the fall semester 2018, choreographed Sirenic, a portrayal of aspects of women in the present day. The title derives from the sirens of Greek mythology, female creatures who, by their song, charm sailors until they are wrecked.

Taking Flight, a new work by associate professor of dance studies Dr. Mark Broomfield, choreographed to Bach’s Cello Suite No. 1 in G major, Yo-Yo Ma’s Prlude, revel in the boundless expression joy, new heights of friendship and rising voices of hope for future generations.

Nicolette Ferguson, Adjunct Professor, will present Light with a solo and a quartet on two musical selections from Edward Bland and the Preservation Hall Jazz Band, exploring the word “Light”, as in not heavy, but easygoing, light, dynamic and living in nature. Deborah Scodese-French, Adjunct Professor will present Women Gather, inspired by a quote from Sark and a community building project in Lake Eyasi, Tanzania, is a contemporary dance that displays and embodies power, comfort, joy and l unity found within a community of women. Jonette Lancos, professor of dance studies, creates a charismatic and radiant classical ballet in the Allegro Vivo section of the Symphony in C by George Bizet.

guest works by students Lauren Hummel ’21, who conceived Absence, based on the journey through grieving a loss and finding acceptance, and Zachary Iannotta ’22, who created Body Love, which deals with the issue of unrealistic societal standards of body image affecting young women mental health. A former student, Samantha Schmeer ’19 explored for her master’s dance auditions, Finding the Zenith on a poem by Edith Sdergran. Rhythms Under the Sun will perform their final dance composition projects using the elements and design principles as displayed in selected paintings.

Dancing on the Edge is led by Professor Jonette Lancos in collaboration with senior student assistants Sonia Bartolomeo ’20, Jessica Clagnaz ’20 and Jordan Wisset ’20. The manager is Julia Albino ’22. Drama teacher Johnnie Ferrell is the mentor of student lighting designers Matthew Esham ’21, Nikko Garmendiz ’19 and Cosette Ratliff ’20. Drama teacher Bonita Stubblefield designs costumes and coaches Megan Palmer ’21.

Dancing on the Edge is supported by generous donations through the Geneseo Foundation from supporters and local businesses. Join Geneseo Dance Ensemble’s 52nd year and 105th dance concert in an evening of distinctive, dynamic and original dance works.


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